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I read a bit abut these programs, I see some results in forums and in internet in general, but any reasonably good method and proper nutrition can get results.

I would like to know if:

Are there papers or academic research that proves the efficacy and efficiency of the Starting Strength and Strong lifts method? (Maybe comparing to others training programs)

I would like to see paper mainly about the linear progression and weight reset .

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I didn't know much about Starting Strength and Strong Lifts either until I joined stackexchange. However, regarding academic research in general, there are also levels of research. Read this to learn more about the best evidence based research when it comes to "research" and "translating back to practice." pccrp.org/docs/PCCRP%20Section%20I.pdf. The point is that there is bad research; there is good research; there is great research, but there is also biased and not evidenced based research, and this is typically more of a "expert opinion." Take everything as a "grain of salt." –  DrTrungNguyen Mar 21 '13 at 2:32
    
Sorry I misspelled on "evidenced," should be "evidence based research." Also, should be an "expert opinion," not a "expert opinion." Watching NCAA March Madness while typing at the same time. –  DrTrungNguyen Mar 21 '13 at 2:39
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possible duplicate of Stronglifts 5x5: an effective program? –  Dave Liepmann Mar 21 '13 at 3:59
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Read Practial Programming by Ron Kilgore and Mark Rippetoe. The second half of the book outlines the program for starting strength, while the first half is dedicated to laying the scientific foundation for why it works. If you want additional sources after that, just refer to the sources in the back of the book. –  Moses Mar 21 '13 at 15:32
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Is there academic research about [insert name of program here]: no. There are too many programs for there to be formal academic research for much of any of them. The most research done for programming was done by the Russians, which is where we got periodized programming from. –  Berin Loritsch Mar 22 '13 at 16:13

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