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The Wikipedia article for complete protein has the following table that lists the optimal profile of the essential amino acids:

Essential Amino Acid | mg/g of Protein

  • Tryptophan | 7
  • Threonine | 27
  • Isoleucine | 25
  • Leucine | 55
  • Lysine | 51
  • Methionine+Cystine | 25
  • Phenylalanine+Tyrosine | 47
  • Valine | 32
  • Histidine | 18

What foods come closest to matching the distribution of amino acids in the table?

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closed as off topic by Ivo Flipse Feb 22 '12 at 15:53

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One measure is the Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS), which ranks the following with 1 being the maximum score and 0 the minimum:

1.00 casein (milk protein)
1.00 egg white
1.00 soy protein
1.00 whey (milk protein)
0.92 beef
0.91 soybeans
0.78 chickpeas
0.76 fruits
0.73 vegetables
0.70 legumes
0.59 cereals and derivatives
0.42 whole wheat

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Where's egg yolk in this list? Arnold said the protein in the yolk is as good as the protein in the whites. –  JoJo Apr 2 '11 at 20:04
    
@Jojo I believe it; much of that list came from jssm.org/vol3/n3/2/v3n3-2pdf.pdf. In reading it, it doesn't seem to me like egg was actually separated into white and yolk, they were just "suggesting" it because of the fat content (another topic). My feeling is that the 1.00 rating actually applies to whole eggs (just goes to show don't believe everything you read on wikipedia!). –  Greg Apr 2 '11 at 23:37
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