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I'm an average weight person trying to lose 5-10 pounds, but possibly like a lot of people, I tend to use the fact that I exercise as a good excuse to eat more. "Oh, I'll need the extra energy later today or tomorrow when I run." That makes sense if you're about to run a race and need top performance out of your run. But when you're trying to lose weight, there must be a balance point between not consuming more (so you'll burn more than you take in) and eating enough to avoid passing out halfway into your workout.

So, assuming a person of say, 35, with an average weight and in reasonably good health is running a moderate pace on a flat surface, where, on average, is that point at which s/he needs to increase intake? I would take the answer in either distance or duration.

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How do you expect this question to be answered? Every activity requires calories, if you want to keep your weight, you have to consume more, if you want to lose weight you have to reduce. It's not like there is a certain threshold that has to be reached (unless you have a specific goal and make it up yourself) –  Baarn Aug 28 '13 at 21:32

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In answer to this:

So, assuming a person of say, 35, with an average weight and in reasonably good health is running a moderate pace on a flat surface, where, on average, is that point at which s/he needs to increase intake?

If you are in good health and running less than 15km in a single session I wouldn't bother with a special diet. Humans literally evolved to travel long distances on little food. If it's less than 25km I wouldn't even bother with special mid-race meals or gels. A weekend warrior who isn't aiming to place should be able to do a half-marathon (21km) on a moderate bowl of pasta the night before, a small bowl of white rice about 1-2hrs pre-race and whatever sugary electrolyte drinks are around the track.

If you are the kind of person that considers a light run to be an excuse to "refeed" it's unlikely that you actually need any special pre-, mid- or post-training nutrition asides from your regular meals.

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Any amount of extra exercise consumes additional calories. 1 mile or 1 meter, it doesn't matter.

You don't need to increase your intake to compensate, especially if your goal is weight loss and not performance.

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