Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physical Fitness Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for physical fitness professionals, athletes, trainers, and those providing health-related needs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

enter image description here

The Flexor Hallucis Longus muscle can be in an intense training during long-distance running, particularly if forefoot running.

How do you maintain the Flexor Hallucis Longus muscle for long-distance running?

Helper questions

  • What kind of stretching and does it vary between different runs?
  • How should you diagnose pain in Flexor Hallucis Longus?
  • What kind of warming up before long distance running and after long distance running? Special tool such as bands?
share|improve this question

migrated from sports.stackexchange.com Sep 7 '13 at 20:37

This question came from our site for participants in team and individual sport activities.

    
What do you mean with 'maintain'? Your body isn't exactly a machine you can grease right on the spot where its a bit stiff. Also, why are you singling out a single muscle? What often happens is that the weakest link gives you problems. If you focus solely on your weakest link, guess who's going to give you trouble next? The second weakest link, so I'd suggest a more holistic approach. –  Ivo Flipse Sep 9 '13 at 20:49
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Before massaging/stretching muscles, warm up and wear enough clothes so your muscles not getting pain just because you are not wearing proper shoes and clothes...

I personally like to use straps and loops besides normal stretching and gym-training. With straps and loops you can easily adjust the intensity and strength even though you was feeling pain after intensive training -- this is a large relief if you are trying to go to sleep, it is possible to massage/stretch the fibula muscles on a lying position if you have a rubber band. If you do not like to do stretching on a hard surface, get a soft stretching mat such as NPR Yoga Mat Pad Non-Slip.

Stretching

  • rubber-band stretching such as resistance band loop (used in Crossfit for example)
  • yoga/pilates stretch strap
  • normal stretching such as leaning against the wall, rolling the ankle around -- typical to warming-ups of dynamic sports such as football

Massage

  • sitting on knees and trying to get fibula muscles relaxed while other person does it like here

  • ask your buddy/massager to locate the key pain points while you are lying relaxed on stomach. Ask him/her to massage them and make him/her understand that he/she must stop if you say so -- so nothing getting broken.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.