Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physical Fitness Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for physical fitness professionals, athletes, trainers, and those providing health-related needs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently come accross this training, I've started it yesterday.

But i'm not sure about the number of sets. I've alway think that 3 sets of 5 rep with a lot a weight was good to bulk up.

Could somebody explain me this.

Also their is not meal plan with this, Their talking about 10 pounds of gain in 6 weeks... I know it's the best case scenario but maybe someone has a good article for this.

Thanks

Here's the source : http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/luis13.htm

share|improve this question
    
Can you link to the source? –  Dave Liepmann Nov 5 '13 at 16:20
    
Oups kinda fail here : bodybuilding.com/fun/luis13.htm –  Greg Nov 5 '13 at 16:23
add comment

2 Answers 2

Set and rep ranges vary based on the immediate goal. Some programs have you vary the sets and reps over the course of the program. But assuming you have enough weight to make the work challenging, here is the rough break down of what rep ranges do for you:

  • 1-3 reps: primarily myofibrilar hypertrophy. This helps you build the ability to lift heavier weights, but has minimal impact on size.
  • 4-6 reps: general purpose lifting. This has a balance of sarcoplasmic and myofibrilar hypertrophy. Has a some impact on both lifting heavier weights and larger muscle.
  • 8-15 reps: primarily sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. This helps you build larger muscles by increasing the energy support systems.
  • 16+ reps: muscular endurance. This helps your muscles endure more work.

There isn't a similar list for number of sets, so instead you are looking at the overall volume of work. Volume is the total sets x reps x weight. If you lift 100 lbs for 10 sets of 10, that's 10,000 lbs of volume. You can shuffle things around and they will all be the same volume. For example 200 lbs for 10 sets of 5. Or 100 lbs for 5 sets of 20. You will find that even though it's the same volume of work, you may find some arrangements very difficult or downright impossible like the last option.

Volume is a measure to judge how much fatigue your body is having to deal with. You may find that 10 x 10 at whatever you are using for the weight is difficult but you are able to do it again in a couple days. You may find that it takes a whole week to be able to do it again and feel fresh. As you get stronger, you can do more volume, and recover a little quicker.

If your goal is putting on lots of muscle, 10 sets of 10 reps will definitely help you do that. Just make sure you are eating and sleeping a lot to adjust to the work load.

share|improve this answer
    
Also to be mentioned in the link provided it says to use a tempo, which is a form of progressive overload, which is a nice addition to that program, really 10 sets of 10 is pretty high volume, but the weight is going to be lighter overall, so the tempo addition is nice.. –  Hituptony Nov 5 '13 at 16:55
2  
True. By playing with tempo, you increase the time under tension, and sometimes minimize the fatigue while doing it. The longer you can stay under tension, the more sarcoplasmic hypertrophy you can induce. You are right, 10 x 10 is a monster amount of reps. Choosing the right weight to work with that is important. –  Berin Loritsch Nov 5 '13 at 17:52
add comment

3 sets of five can help you get bigger. Ten sets of 10 will too, if you can handle it and don't overtrain. 100 heavy reps is an extremely high workload. Make sure your diet, sleep, and so on are dialed in if you're on this program.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.