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I'm planning to buy my first minimalistic shoe, and I've encountered some attributes of certain shoes that I understand now, but still, I don't know what footbed or drop parameters should I buy in the first place for the first 1-2 years.

I run on mixed terrain, half the action happens on road and half on trail. I run 4 times a week, for 1 hour in each session (with regular, extremely-cushioned shoe - knee technique), and I'm not planning to run more or less with a minimalistic shoe. Running is really just an add-on for my other sport activities.

Can I or should I go for the very-minimalistic style, or should I stick with a ~6 mm drop parameter?

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1 Answer 1

To make the transition you need to slowly incorporate minimalist shoes or you'll injure yourself. Even just walking. Your body will need time to adjust to forefoot striking. Its not like just buying another pair of padded sneakers. My first pair of Minimalist shoes are the New Balance Minimus Trails. The 10v2 model.

True minimalist shoes have no heel to toe drop. These have a very small drop so these shoes are considered a transitional shoe, but I tell you they are incredibly comfortable on concrete and on dirt.

Haven't really tried much on grass since its getting colder and damper out. I would highly recommend them, at least to start out. Its like rehab for your feet. You can't go cold turkey off of cigarettes; its a gradual change. Its the same with high heeled trainers to minimalist shoes. It takes a lot of effort. More than you'd think, but well worth it once you get used to it! Hope this helped!

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