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I have just increased my barbell weight from 18kg to 24kg for when I am doing bicep curls.

I've noticed that I am getting a slight pain in my forearm (closer to my elbow) as I raise the bar.

Is this an indication I might be attempting to lift too much? Or do you think after some more training the pain may subside (increase in strength)?

I have already read this question but my pain is during the lift rather than after.

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both forearms pain or its any 1? –  Braj Apr 23 at 6:29
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This may not be the answer you're looking for, but you probably shouldn't increase your working weight by 33%. Around 10% is what most people deem save, especially for beginners. Maybe you want to reduce weight to 20kg and try that for a week or two? –  LarissaGodzilla Apr 23 at 6:46
    
@Braj it is only my right arm, which is why I though I would ask the question. My left seems comfortable but I might be using my right more than my left. –  Masterbuddha Apr 23 at 10:09
    
@LarissaGodzilla Thanks for the suggestion I'll try 20kg for a couple of weeks and see how that goes. –  Masterbuddha Apr 23 at 10:10
    
@Masterbuddha As its only right arm, extra weight might be d suspect. Increase in weight may cause imbalance while lifting which results in pain. Me too had this issue some time ago. –  Braj Apr 23 at 10:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I actually hate the idea of answering questions with comments as well as questions not having a real answer, so this might be a bit OCD, but here we go:

As I pointed out in the comments, you probably did raise your working weight too fast. While different programs use a wide range of progressions, most agree on raising the working weight by a maximum of 10% of what you managed to do the last workout.

That doesn't mean you have to raise your weigths super-slowly, though. In fact, as long as you manage your target set and rep count with good form, you can raise you weight each workout. This requires top-notch regeneration, though (calorie surplus, enough sleep, no stress etc.).

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Thank you, I was going to suggest that. This way it make it easier for others to find the answer they want. –  Masterbuddha Apr 27 at 22:58

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