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I'm looking to change my workout, just to keep me motivated (I do this every 3-4 months) and wondered if there were any home gym/free (open source like) programs similar to Crossfit or p90x. The problem with either is that they require specific equipment or dvd's......and I'd rather not pay anything.

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insanity requires no equipment...but man it's insane! nvm, you said no dvd. –  kjy112 Apr 28 '11 at 16:39
    
Why don't you just join your local crossfit box? –  Stefan Kendall Aug 21 '11 at 0:54

3 Answers 3

CrossFit is a free program. It's completely "open source" insofar as the exercises are published and free to use without charge. You just can't slap CrossFit logos on everything and try to make money off of it without becoming an affiliate.

You can do a great many CrossFit style workouts with bodyweight alone. Some ideas include:

  • Squats (box, air, jumping)
  • Burpees
  • Pushups
  • Handstand pushups
  • Lunges (jumping too)
  • Sprinting
  • Running
  • Dips (using a chair or box)

With very minimal equipment you can add even more exercises. Since you mention home gym I'm going to assume that a set of dumbbells is a given:

  • Dumbbell turkish getups
  • Dumbbell snatches
  • Dumbbell cleans (squat, power)
  • Dumbbell press (push)
  • Dumbbell jerk (push)
  • Dumbbell lunges
  • Dumbbell thrusters
  • Man makers
  • Dumbbell swings

If your home gym has even a single barbell that opens up a ton more exercises. If you don't have bumper plates you'll just have to avoid max overhead weights.

If you're willing to spend minimal money you can add several more CF exercises to your repertoire:

  • Sandbags - Video of how to make your own
    • Sandbag clean
    • Sandbag getups
    • Sandbag runs
    • Overhead sandbag runs/lunges
  • Medicine Balls - You can make your own by cutting a large slit in a basketball, filling it with sand, and then taping the entire ball thoroughly with duct tape.
    • Wallball
    • Medicine ball cleans
    • Overhead medicine ball lunges
  • Plyo boxes (Can be built for < $20 assuming you already have tools PDF)
  • Jump rope

The only thing that's noticeably lacking is pullup equipment. You're stuck with either buying a bar, or you could spend $30 and get one that fits in a door frame: Iron Gym Total Upper Body Workout Bar. I have one of these and it works great for pullups. Unless you're really short you won't be able to do kipping or butterfly pullups, just deadhangs.

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Thanks - I'm very interested in Cross Fit now!!! –  Meade Rubenstein Apr 29 '11 at 12:02

I'd add a few things to hobodave's response:

  1. Crossfit Bodyweight Workout Resource. Awesome PDF that lists just about every kind of workout you can do with minimal or no equipment. Broken down by categories: "metcons, no equipment required", "metcons, jump rope, rings and pull-up bar required", "running workouts", "endurance challenges", etc.

  2. Many Crossfitters setup gyms in their garages. Some will let you workout with them for cheap or free. Try posting on the Crossfit messageboard to try to find someone in your area.

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Join a Meetup group

You don't need a program, you need people already doing it to join with.

To stay motivated during a high intense workouts you'll need other people do to it with. It's free and unless you live in the styx you should be able to find a P90X or equivalent fitness group near you.

From my personal experiences with meetup doing other activities (snowboarding, wakeboarding, etc) the people are generally very helpful/accepting as long as you don't act like a complete douchebag.

Chances are, you'll probably find a group with a core of members who are super-active and at a much higher level than you that will have tips/pointers to help get you through the plateaus.

If you're really dedicated to stepping up your progress in the long term it'd be best to accept that this is something that you want to do as a lifestyle, not just a hobby.

The workout regiment programs are only really useful as a crutch to get started. It sounds like you're beyond that point and starting to settle into the maintenance/plateau stage.

Personally, when I plateau during a workout I lay off of the workouts for a few months before I start again because I have other activities (extreme sports mostly) I do to stay in shape. Ie, I don't really exercise as a lifestyle so the extra effort isn't 'worth it' but fitness isn't my primary goal.

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