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I'm 6.5 feet and only weight about 160-170lbs. My nutrition is very healthy and I eat a lot - seriously a lot. I found some good websites with good recipes for a healthy way of life. Fish, Meat, Milk, Egg all important things are included.

However, I'm not able to gain weight. This might be due to my endurance training, which sums up to a lot. I usually go running once/twice a week (10km-15km) - not because I need to but I want to. I also go swimming (once a week, sometimes every two weeks) and play football/badminton and other sports. I also cycle to and from work and so on...

I really don't want to stop this endurance training but I don't want to look skinny anymore. I go to the gym on regulary base (2-split, twice a week = 4 times a week) and prefer doing excercices with a lot of weights and less reputations. This increases my strength, but neither am I gaining weight nor do I get bigger muscles.

Do I really need to stop eating healthy or doing endurance training for getting some weight? Should I start to eat like a pig? Box of eggs every day, 20 fruits, kg of pasta or what can I do?

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3  
Do you track your food? What's your daily calorie intake? –  John Kugelman Jul 21 at 20:37
2  
x2 on the tracking. You appear to only have a vague idea of how much you expend and how much you take in. (Not really a criticism, just an observation. Many people are in the same situation). –  JohnP Jul 21 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

You will gain weight by eating more calories than you take in. Right now, it appears that you are eating healthy, lower calories foods, and due to this even with your large intake you still come out even. While its very reasonable to put on weight with the amount of cardio you are doing, right now your diet is preventing any gains.

Keeping a log can be a great way to identify the actual amount of calories you eat during the day. You can also use this log to track protein, although from the foods you eat it sounds as though you get plenty. Once you have a number that represents your average, try adding 500-1000 to it each day, preferably with high carb foods, as it looks like thats a weak point in your diet. One way you could do this is to cook up a large bowl of pasta after your workout each day. Once you start eating more, you may also find you have more energy during your lifting sessions, which will allow for more intense workouts, and thereby more gains in musculature.

Generally healthy eaters have a good sense of how much they should eat in a day, and find it difficult to go beyond that amount. Eating enough to put on weight will require you to potentially eat more than you'll feel comfortable with, and types of foods which may not be ones generally recognized as 'healthy' for a diet. The log will help assure you that you are indeed eating the correct amount to gain muscle, and not overeating in a manner which will lead to fat gain.

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What are you eating after you long/hard workouts? It's really important to replace the glycogen that you burned; if you do not, your body will tear down your muscle to help build back your glycogen stores. The earlier after the long/hard workouts, the better.

Chocolate milk is a good choice if you tolerate dairy products well. I like a recovery drink called "Endurox". Or you can eat small snack/meal that is mostly carbs but with some protein as well.

Give that a try and see if it helps...

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