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Good day,

Before going to the gym, and as far as I remember, even in my youth, I always had various bodyaches: wrists, knees, shoulders and sometimes my back.

I started going to the gym about a year and half ago. Going about 3 times a week for like 2 months and half straight, and I must say I did great and my aches left completly.

Then I quit because I moved and it became too complicated with the travelling distance.

The problem is that, since I quit, my bodyaches are back but also I'm having weaknesses and constant tiredness since then.

I always had a muscular build even before going to the gym and I still have it today even though I'm slowly gaining all the fat I've lost doing the gym (I doubt I am sick because I'm not lossing weight).

I am a computer programmer, that gives you a hint on how my muscles are being solicited : not at all and also, I'm not doing any sports.

I can lives with the bodyaches because I always did but I just can't stands the weaknesses and tiredness. Is there a reason with my problems and me having quit the gym?

Thank you

PS: I am not a doctor fan, I went there only once since my 14 y.o. and I am now 27.

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What can I say about my nutritions, I'm not a cakes and soft drinks fans and I drink water and I believe I eats judiciously. Also, I'm 5'5" and 165 pounds. –  Cybrix Jul 3 '11 at 5:25
    
I'm not a doctor, but I would first look at your sleep pattern. Are you getting enough sleep? –  Salsero69 Jul 5 '11 at 2:28
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1 Answer

You've probably got a couple things going on at the same time. And it has to do with both nutrition and exercise. The fact that your aches and pains went away after you started going to the gym regularly gives you a hint.

Our bodies were meant to be exercised. Plain and simple. When you physically demand more of your body it responds in turn by getting ready for the next time.

I think you'll find that if you find a way to be active every day, your energy levels will rise to meet those demands. Also, getting your blood pumping does wonders for helping you stay alert and think more clearly.

Inflammatory foods can increase sickness and aches/pains while anti-inflammatory foods do the opposite. Check nutritional data at http://nutritiondata.self.com and look at the "Inflammatory index". You want a net -100 to feel healthy.

Another gotcha is that if you rely on quick carbs (candy bars, brownies, sugar, high fructose corn syrup, processed foods) you get a double whammy. Not only are those foods highly inflammatory, but they produce a spike in energy followed by lethargy and hunger after the pancreas spikes the insulin to deal with it. When you do carbs, try to make sure they are complex whole carbs so that they take longer to process and give you a more controlled release of energy throughout the day.

Because you say that you've always had a decent muscular build I'm assuming you have enough protein in your diet. That's a good thing. Just keep in mind that you may have to increase it after getting active again. Also, keep up the water intake. It should be at least 2L a day.

My recommendations for you:

  • Get active again. If nothing else buy a bike and ride around your neighborhood. Find a new gym if you have to.
  • Fine tune your diet, till you find a good combo that helps you feel good and not put on extra pounds.
  • Forget about calories, and concentrate on portions. Adjust your protein, carbs, fats portions in 10% increments until you get a good balance. Believe it or not, excess carbs contribute most to stored fat than anything else.
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Thank you for your answer and the link provided. If I get to the gym or start doing exercise, and as my energy rise back to normal ( I am assuming I'm not at a normal state), that means my unusual tiredness will also dissapear? –  Cybrix Jul 3 '11 at 14:48
    
That was my experience. With regular routine exercise and eating healthy foods most of the time I'm rarely tired unless I've been up for too long. At least that has a good reason for it. –  Berin Loritsch Jul 4 '11 at 12:53
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