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I had pulled my groin muscle, so I cooled it with ice after the injury occurred and took 2 days of rest. Now I am feeling better, but I want to prevent the injury from reoccurring.

So can anyone recommend me some exercises for me for strengthening my groin muscles??

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Hi @Priyank, care to elaborate on what kind of exercise you were doing when you got the pulled muscle? Also try to make your titles describe your problem, that way you'll attract better answers. –  Ivo Flipse Jul 11 '11 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

Squats are a very effective workout that gets your whole body involved in the right proportions. The key to keeping your adductors involved is to push your knees apart when you are "in the hole" and while you are raising back up. The squat gets your calves, hamstrings, glutes, quads, adductors, core, and back muscles all together in the right proportions.

Word of advice: swallow your pride and go light at the beginning. As long as you add weight every session for as long as you can do that, you will be lifting heavy weights soon enough.

The primary reason for muscle injuries is unbalanced strength. This is why I recommend a compound lift like the squat (to parallel) to build up your adductor (groin) muscles. There will be a number of other supporter/stabilizing muscles that need to catch up, and it's always the weakest link that gets injured first.

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I agree, especially about going light to begin with –  Meade Rubenstein Jul 11 '11 at 14:53

Simple answer: hip adduction. Use a machine or lie on your side and lift your lower leg up.

Generally, there are lots of stabilizer muscles (e.g. obliques) that don't get exercised properly and lead to injuries of weekend athletes. Specifically targeting them with exercises like hip adduction/abduction and roman twists can help. Using free-weights with uneven loads or exercising only one side at a time can also help tremendously.

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