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When I've gone ice skating, I've always just let friction eventually slow me down (or the wall). I don't want to do this anymore!

What can I do to train myself to stop properly? What is the process of coming to a complete stop at will, the form the body should take, and the muscles that are actively used while doing so?

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Is this on ice hockey skates? –  Ivo Flipse Aug 8 '11 at 14:10
    
Either hockey skates or figure skates. Hockey skates feel better though I don't know what the differences between them and figure skates are. Either way, I still can't stop on my own. –  Matt Chan Aug 8 '11 at 14:15
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Blade shape and width, and the toe pick at the front are the major differences. The toe pick is a jagged claw type structure that figure skaters use to jam into the ice to block their momentum for upward movements (axels, leap, lutzes, etc.) Hockey blades are shorter, and more rounded at front and back for maneuverability. Also, the structure of the boot is different to accommodate support and mobility differences between the sports. –  JohnP Jan 18 '13 at 18:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are several ways to brake with ice skates:

A good way to practice these techniques is by skating at a slow to moderate pace a few meters from the boarding and then try to break just in front of it. Worst case you fall over against the boarding and can grab on to break your fall.

Attribution to Yahoo Answers for finding some of the video's

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I use figure skates and I lift up my skate and put it back down with the tip of my skate dragging on the ground. You will eventully come to a stop. It may feel like you are going to fall the first couple times but after you get the hang of it it is really easy. You should try this.

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