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I bought some Optimum Nutrition creatine (Creapure blend of creatine monohydrate) and it does not dissolve in liquids. When I stir the creatine into a sugary drink or even plain water, the crystals get stuck on the side of the glass. To not waste the creatine, I am thinking of taking the creatine without liquids.

  • Directly from the spoon to the mouth. Would this make it too concentrated and thus dangerous?
  • Sprinkling it on cooked food. Will the heat destroy creatine?
  • Sprinkling it on cold foods. Is this the safest way?
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2 Answers 2

The only side-effect which can occur due to supplementating creatine without a liquid is gastrointestinal distress, probably due to osmotic load, as reported in Res Sports Med. 2008;16(1):15-22.

Sprinkling on warm food is most likely no problem.

The creatine being stuck on the glass with plain water is most likely due to a 'bad' creatine brand. Micronized sorts usually don't stick to the glass with plain water, and if you're worrying about this, supplement a little more to compensate with the creatine left over in the glass.

Concerning taking creatine with sugars, just taking a glass of a beverage with glucose (estimated around 30 gr of glucose) won't do much. The increased uptake of creatine comes from the insulin response caused by the glucose. Only high and supraphysiological concentrations of insulin will significantly increase uptake of creatine into the muscle. As reported in Am J Physiol. 1998 Dec;275(6 Pt 1):E974-9. This pretty much means you'll need to take 100+ gr of glucose. Not really beneficial if you ask me.

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Res Sports Med. 2008;16(1):15-22 did not mention that the subjects took creatine without liquids. –  JoJo Dec 12 '11 at 7:02
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They don't, but the authors clearly state that it would be wise to split the dose if you take for example 10 gr. As they guess the following is the reason behind the gastrointestinal distress: "It seems that these side effects are dose dependent and principally are due to the presence of large quantities of undissolved creatine particles residing within the intestinal compartment. " So you can easily conclude it. –  GetXXL Dec 12 '11 at 10:01
    
Hi @GetXXL. That is some good information. Consider adding it to your main answer which would make it even better so it doesn't get lost in the comments. I also deleted the last two comments here. Please keep things civil. There is no need to throw unfounded accusations. Feel free to discuss things on the Physical Fitness Meta or in Physical Fitness Chat. –  Matt Chan Dec 13 '11 at 19:12
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Looks like the best way to get this into your system 'optimally' consume it with something like grape juice:

(From http://www.everything-creatine.com/Creatine_FAQ.html)

Ways to Take Creatine. You will find many different recommendations on how to take creatine. Studies have shown that you get a 60% greater cell uptake of creatine if you combine it with a simple sugar base, such as grape juice ( naturally rich in glucose ). A big insulin spike will push the creatine into the muscle. Do not ever take creatine with orange juice! Very simply it negates the positive effects due to it's acidity. This is presently a matter for open debate, but possibly the best way to take CM is with warm water; you can add simple carbohydrates if required. Cranberry juice is recommended if you are prone to upset stomachs, it can help alleviate the upset.

Thus it doesn't appear you are doing anything dangerous but not taking it without liquids (though you can cramp if you take little to no water/liquids) but you are short-changing the effects of Creatine if you do not consume it in an optimal way.

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It appears from the article that the purpose of taking creatine with juice is the sugar helps shuttle the creatine into the muscles. It does not mention whether the state (solid or liquid) of creatine affects its nutrition value. From this info alone, one could speculate that taking a spoonful of creatine directly to the mouth and drinking juice 5 seconds later would create the same effect as drinking creatine mixed into the juice. –  JoJo Dec 1 '11 at 18:28
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