Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physical Fitness Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for physical fitness professionals, athletes, trainers, and those providing health-related needs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The accepted theory (I think) is that quick-twich (white) muscle is responsible for sprinting and weight lifting and slow-switch (red) muscle is for endurance.

We know that too much endurance exercise results in muscle loss. Are big muscles always piles of the quick-twitch muscle or should we somehow work out that other muscle type.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually we have some fairly massive muscles such as our abs, traps, and calves which are made up mostly of slow twitch fibers. Now with that established i think i can answer your question. You asked if big muscles are always piles of fast twitch fibers. Well most muscles are, but like i mentioned those 3 muscle groups are not. Now the way that we train these muscles is by doing a lot more reps. For instance the abs and calves are muscles which are usually trained to failure, the reason being is that in order to make them bigger or stronger we must go after the slow twitch fibers which require more reps. The traps too are muscles which require more reps, meaning if say somebody usually does only 1 to 5 reps per set, like in a case where he is training for strength, he will still do somewhere close to 15 reps for his traps. So what im saying is, yes we do workout those muscles differently, we do more reps. By doing this we will not lose muscle as you pointed out in your question because that only happens if your endurance training, but if the muscles is made up mostly of slow twitch fibers then doing more reps is not endurance training .

share|improve this answer
    
excellent answer - thanks –  Mike S Apr 4 '12 at 4:41
    
glad I can help –  Usedtobefat Apr 4 '12 at 4:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.