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From http://www.runningplanet.com/training/top-ten-characteristics-running-form.html

Dorsiflexed Foot

What is the first stride key you think about during the drive phase of your running stride? You probably think of either lifting, driving or pulling your knee up and through. That is a good stride key but there may be a better one. How about first raising your toes? When you raise your toes you are dorsiflexing your foot at your ankle. If you concentrate on dorsiflexing your foot you are putting your foot in the proper position for a flat footed touchdown, pre stretching your calf to maximize energy return and are also encouraging a “triple response” in which your knee and hip flex into proper running stride position.

I was wondering what "the drive phase of your running stride" mean when the quote suggests to dorsiflex foot? Is it the phase when one foot leaves the ground, the leg moves forward, but the foot hasn't landed yet? Thanks!

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Plantar flexion of the foot happens when you point your toes. This is what's happening when you first push off the ground. Your heel lifts first, then you push off with the rest of the foot, ending with your toes.

Dorsiflexion is the opposite, so after you point your toes, you need to pull them back up towards your shin. That's what the snippet that you provided is saying, is that that movement to recover from the toe point/pushoff should be one of the first things that you initiate as you bring your leg forward and knee up to prepare for your next step on that side.

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