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I want to buy myself equipment for jogging.

Right now I dont have motivation for jogging for a number of reasons:

  1. I dont like jogging
  2. I never know the distance i am jogging so i can't really track how far i jogged, how fast i jogged, how many calories i burned, etc.

Now, I want to make jogging more attractive to me by buying some equipment like a watch with gps etc. But I don't really know what i have to look for.

My questions is: Can somebody show me some good beginner and advanced equipment such as watches for jogging?

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you can read the DC rainmaker blog for tests of a variety of training equipment, see dcrainmaker.com –  FredrikD Sep 11 '12 at 11:15
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Lots of hardware out there, usually in watch format with wirelessly connected remote devices.

You get the main watch with time, alarms, stopwatch, often computer download modes.

Then the accessories. Heart Rate Monitors almost all use chest straps, (lick/wet the strap to get it to work at first, once you start sweating you will be fine, but when you first put it on, likely won't get a reading) to measure heart rate and transmit the data to the watch.

Then there are two approaches to distance.

1) GPS:

Like your car or phone GPS, but alas not great for running accuracy. Has issues when it is cloudy, in cities with tall buildings and not a large enough view of the sky, and trees. (Getting better in later models).

Anecdotally two friends ran a known marked half marathon course side by side, wearing the same Garmin 201 GPS (Earlier model) but with different firmware revisions. Over 21.1K they differed by 4K.

The issue with GPS is the cumulative error. Every GPS reading has some minor error in it. In a car, you can travel several hundred or thousand feet between readings (say once a minute?) but running you likely can have an error bar that is greater than the distance travelled. And each error is independent of the previous one, so it can cancel out or build up. It just depends on satellites in view, and atmospheric conditions.

The antennae are often large, and thus the watches seem bulkier but that seems to be getting better as well with each new generation of device.

Having said that, modern GPS users seem to love them.

2) Intertial foot pods:

Not sure if these are loosing traction as GPS units get smaller, but these measure acceleration, integrate back to get velocity and again to get distance travelled. Each step your foot with the pod attached accelerates forward and decellerates as it moves. It measures these and adds them up.

There is a calibration run you should do periodically, but these are not terrible on accuracy.

If you get a model that has a computer interface you get to download all the good stuff and play with the data.

Calories are always an estimate. Running X minutes does not burn Y calories. Depends on weight, slope of the run, pace of the run, etc. Heart Rate helps a bit in estimating as it gives a better effort estimate but everybody is so different it is mostly an estimate still.

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Thanks i think that i will try this out, even if it isn't 100% reliable.. I think that it should be enough for a motivation boost :) –  Aytac Sep 26 '12 at 9:20
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Until my MOTOACTV I used a Garmin Forerunner 305; loved it, despite it being the size of my head.

I've been pretty happy with the MOTOACTV, plus it plays music. I just use my old Garmin chest monitor; I didn't buy anything new. It also connects via BT to my phone, which is convenient on occasion. And it can do BT audio. IMO their website is a little lacking in functionality, but it's improving.

As noted, GPS accuracy can vary, but it's been "good enough" for me. Calorie consumption estimation is just that, an estimate, but it seems to do okay–when I was being hyper-vigilant about in/out numbers my weightloss seemed to align fairly well with its numbers and my food calculations.

All this said, there are a ton of options; lots of people just use something like RunKeeper or CardioTrainer on their phone, stick with a single device, and are perfectly happy. I suspect there's no great way to answer this question with anything other than a list of things you might try.

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