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I current have a solid 50lb kettlebell that I use. I'm looking to upgrade, but prices for solid kettlebells are very expensive. I saw this adjustable handle on amazon (pic)enter image description here for about $35 and it can take up to 70 lbs...still not the max weight I was hoping for, but an improvement and ability to adjust down for other kettlebell exercises. Does anyone have any experience with this model or similar low cost ones?

After following Dave's advice and checking out the parts needed via RossTraining, here's my homemade version - cost $15 (I do need to shorten the handles a little) enter image description here

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Homemade version: youtube.com/watch?v=EuA-565ldAY –  Dave Liepmann Sep 20 '12 at 16:07
    
@Dave - thanks for the info (you should make it the answer) - here's a link to a detail build: davedraper.com/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=PmWiki.T-Handle –  Meade Rubenstein Sep 21 '12 at 11:09
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First, let's get some terminology out of the way. In order to be a kettlebell, I would require the tool to be one solid piece of metal. Adjustable kettlebell substitutes are apparently called "T-handles" instead. The model pictured above has an actual handle, whereas homemade versions may just be designed to grab on to a straight stick of pipe. They work for swings, but I wouldn't use any of these "non-kettlebell kettlebells" for, say, snatches.

Many people make these adjustable kettlebell T-handles themselves. The model pictured above has an actual handle, whereas homemade versions may just be designed to grab on to a straight stick of pipe.

Here is a quick demo video of the T-handle creation process. Dave Draper has detailed instructions, with a link to Ross Enamait demoing his variation of the equipment (he adds a homemade collar and recommends swinging from blocks to avoid hitting the ground with heavy loads).

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