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I just started using protein powder today. I'm using Muscle Milk. I am lactose intolerant and it doesn't bother my stomach.

This is the label of the product. It says 70 grams powder with 10 fl oz water. According to WolframAlpha, 10 fl oz = 300 ml. But I'm not sure if this calculation is correct. My trainer told me, "use 1 scoop (35 grams) with 250 ml water". Also, checking that label, under Directions and Use, an image shows the shaker is almost full, but my shaker is 700ml. 300 ml looks too low.

Am I making a mistake while converting "fl oz" to "ml"?

In short, I have Muscle Milk, how much water should I use with 2 scoops (70 grams) powder and 1 scoop (35 grams) powder? My shaker is 700 ml.

Also, regarding usage, I'll sip 1 scoop shake while working out, and another 2 scoop shake after my workout. It's about 460 calories. Is it too much?

My goal is to burn fat, and be stronger. I'm following StrongLifts' 5x5 program, it's my 6th week. I lost 3 kgs and gained muscle. I want to keep this performance.

Any help will be greatly appreciated :)

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Congratulations on the progress bro! –  Mike S Oct 29 '12 at 23:21
    
thank you @MikeS ! –  Eray Nov 2 '12 at 20:53
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The graphics on products like that aren't really meant to be looked at with the sort of detail you're reading. They're only supposed to provide a very broad view of how to not mess up horribly when taking the supplement - I have little doubt that if they didn't provide any usage instructions at all, there would be a considerable number of people who would try to take the powder dry, or try sprinkling it over their cereal or something. It doesn't work like that!

The graphics and suggestions on the back are for usages a 'normal' person in a 'normal' situation. You'd be surprised how few people are truly 'normal' with those things. Your trainer knows best. We cannot really judge without knowing more about your workout and your calorie intake, so it's kind of up to you to find the specifics with the professionals and people you trust to know the details.

Regarding your usage and if it's 'too much', if you're getting results then no, it's not! I generally prefer to drink only water while working out, but there's no research pinpointing ideal protein supplement use to my knowledge, so people are generally left to do what works for them. A better question would be, what is your primary goal? You've mentioned it's to burn fat and be stronger. But which one is more important to you? Since it's burning fat, then you might talk to a dietitian to figure out how your shakes fit in to your overall calorie intake; you will not lose fat if you are eating too much. There are a few other things you can do if possible to help your weight loss goal, which may or may not be possible since you're a very busy college student:

  • Keep snacks on you, and snack throughout the day. This will keep your metabolism going by constantly giving it a little something to work with. This will also keep you from getting overhungry and gorging yourself at meals. Some of my favorites are greek yogurt, organic peanut butter, and blueberries. All of these are quite portable, have good nutritional value, and can be eaten trivially. I bought a pack of 150 plastic spoons for 1 USD and I just throw them out after I'm done snacking on my yogurt or peanut butter.

  • Stop eating artificial stuff as much as you can. Soda is a low-hanging fruit here. Don't drink soda. Ever. It gives you nothing but toxins and empty calories. If you need a caffeine pick-me-up, buy a tea thermos and use a caffeinated tea.

  • Don't be afraid of dietary fat. Clean fats from well-prepared beef, chicken, and pork make up every nerve ending in your body. Adding something like an egg or a lean burger to a meal can immensely increase how satisfying it is and keep you full for much longer. That will also turn into you needing to eat fewer calories to stay satisfied.

These are just some very basic things, and I'd urge you to see a professional to get help on specifics, though.

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Actually he isn't my personal trainer . I mean, he isn't tracking my workouts, he didn't know my weight, didn't know my fat ratio, he didn't know anything about me. He is just manager of GYM . It's a little GYM and i don't have personal trainer. He just looked at product and said "use 1 scoop with 250ml water" . Because of this i'm not trusting him. –  Eray Oct 29 '12 at 16:16
    
@Eray Oh, that's fair. Well, we'd need a lot more detail to give an informed idea of what would and wouldn't be appropriate. If you could update your question with things like how many times you eat per day, what you eat at specific times, etc it would help a lot. –  YYY Oct 29 '12 at 16:19
    
And i have to choose one of "burning fat" or "be stronger" . I'll choose burning fat. Because i have belly fat. I'm not eating too much. But i don't have a good diet. –  Eray Oct 29 '12 at 16:19
    
i know it's too bad , but i can't eat periodically. I'm studing at university and i'm far from my family. In short, i'm really far from eating periodically and eating healthy home foods :) I'm staying at my school's hostel. And eating at hostel's canteen, generally. I'm eating a breakfast, a few snacks at middle of day and dinner at canteen. –  Eray Oct 29 '12 at 16:21
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@Eray I'll do my best! I really don't have too many details, though, so please don't hold it against me if I'm not too helpful. :p –  YYY Oct 29 '12 at 16:33
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