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15

There are two concerns I see with the person who waits an extra ten years before becoming active. Sensitive Ages for Athletic Attributes In his book Science of Sports Training, Tom Kurz goes into several pages of detail on how to maximize the potential of an athlete by matching their age-related susceptibility to certain kinds of development with the ...


13

Work into it slowly. If you're experiencing that many problems from it often, then you are likely training too hard. I've known 70 year olds who could easily out-do me in the martial arts without breaking a sweat or getting injured. It has far less to do with your age than with your experience and endurance.


10

Personally I would look at the leading causes of death in (my case) the United States: Heart disease: 596,577 Cancer: 576,691 Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 142,943 Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 128,932 Accidents (unintentional injuries): 126,438 Alzheimer's disease: 84,974 Diabetes: 73,831 Influenza and Pneumonia: 53,826 Nephritis, nephrotic ...


9

There are several aspects to aging, and depending on what you do will affect how you age. It's not as simple as "just be fit and you'll stay healthier". Apparently there is a book on the subject that will provide a much rounder picture than I can provide here. Sarcopenia is the sad fact that you will lose muscle as you age. However, depending on the ...


7

A proper exercise routine, including strength training, can be extremely beneficial and helpful to anyone, including the elderly. You should always consult your physician before beginning an exercise routine to see if you are healthy enough to perform it, especially if you have heart, lung, or other ailments. "Geriatric Times" published an interesting ...


6

I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In ...


5

The cheapest piece of exercise equipment for grip strength is one of those binder clips: They come in difference sizes, so start small and work your way up. Pinch it open between your pinky and your thumb. This tip comes from Mr. Ed Coan himself. When your grip breaks, it's always the pinky side first. If you get that side stronger the grip will be ...


5

In addition to what Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore had to say in Practical Programming for Strength Training, as an over 40 lifter I can offer what I've figured out for training at this stage in my life. Jumping right in after any kind of layoff results in very intense DOMS. Just keep at it and your body will get used to it. I can train longer and harder ...


5

In Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore's Practical Programming for Strength Training, they include a chapter on Masters athletes, "usually defined as individuals 35-40 years of age and over". Here are a few relevant excerpts: A significant consideration for the masters athlete is the reduction in recovery capacity over the years. [P]eriodization of ...


5

Yes, whey protein can be helpful for elderly people also. The Journal of The American College of Nutrition, JACN, reports that the elderly have greater protein requirements than younger adults. Given that your mother is exercising, ingesting whey protein (or other biologic sources of protein), especially immediately following exercise, may well help her ...


4

I realize it is anecdotal evidence, but when you have power lifters in there 70s and 80s still pulling heavy (like a John Bourgoin from Canada's powerlifting federation), you don't have to let age deter you. I know of one 63 year old power lifter in New Zealand who still feels as if he's making good gains. Recovery will become more of an issue the older ...


4

I did gymnastics as a kid and tried to get back into it two years ago. I trained hard before going back to the gym, however I found my body couldn't deal with it. I tried to ease myself in and I was still able to do a lot of what I could before, but I was finding I was waking up the next day and something would be strained or incredibly sore (I don't just ...


4

Testosterone production peaks in your 30s and steadily declines thereafter. Since testosterone is the most important hormone for muscle growth, you will need to put more effort into your workout to see the same gains. I have not heard anything about the actual muscle tissue fundamentally change as you age. Your digestion efficiency also declines as you ...


4

I would suggest doing an exercise that will work your grip and another muscle group at the same time, like dead-lifts, shrugs, farmer's walk, etc. Probably the easiest of the ones mentioned would be shrugs and easy to progress since you can incrementally add weight after every week or so. I don't like using straps or gloves or anything that will ...


3

As a 50+ athlete, I can tell you that gains are still possible. However, they are harder to achieve and less frequent. It's just part of the aging process. That doesn't mean you can't train with gains in mind. You just need to train smarter.


3

I'm 41. I was doing regular workouts 2 times a week, and am now doing Jui Jitsu 1 time a week. This feels about right. I'm 8 weeks in now, and am recovering within 2-3 days (where it took the full week after the first session). While it is much more abusive than my regular workouts, it is becoming easier as my body adapts to it (and I learn not to ...


2

Depends on what you mean by "aging better". Aging has a lot of different aspects, for example the loss of health (e.g. increased cardiovascular risk), loss of physical fitness, and deterioration of physical appearance. There is no question at all that exercise prevents age-related health problems, and there are countless studies on that subject. Here's a ...


2

Berin's explanation hits on a bunch of seriously good points, but as a diabetic who's taken a very keen interest in the whys and wherefores of my disease, I think I can fill in some of the blanks here. Firstly, it's important to understand that all carbs you eat will eventually boil down to sugars. The particulars vary based on the kind of carb, but I will ...


2

It is beneficial to delay the weight increase you would otherwise get with aging, since the set point weight would increase. For instance, if you are 75kg at age 20 and that is a "good" weight, if you increase to obese 85kg at age 30, you are in a worse position than if you had exercised more and only increased to 80kg.


2

I'm going to be 50 next year and have been looking into this. I found this interesting article http://tkdtutor.com/TOPICS/Training/Strength/Age/Age-01.htm There is a basic strength program on the last page An interesting quote from the article: "Men, who are 70 years of age who have resistance-trained since 50 years of age, had muscle cross-sectional area ...


2

You are currently placing a pulling load on a muscle system and seeing which part of the system fails first. It's easy to forget that strength training involves more than training just the muscle. It also involves load on the tendons, ligaments, and bones. Since you are experiencing what feels like inflammation of the tendons, it seems logical that the ...


2

If you want to make gains like a 20 year old, you'll have to have the testosterone and estrogen levels of a 20 year old. On the surface, this doesn't answer your question... but it does, please follow: Your first question is, "How much muscle/strength could I really expect to gain over age 50?" I am not sure that this is answerable. In what way would ...


2

This study/article from the Stanford School of Medicine looks at older runners over almost twenty years. It shows that: Elderly runners have fewer disabilities, a longer span of active life and are half as likely as aging nonrunners to die early deaths ... Here's a paragraph that explains the methodology of the study: Fries’ team began tracking 538 ...


2

It's never too late to improve your health and fitness. You may not be able to get the exact physique you want due to reduced testosterone, but, that doesn't mean you can't improve on what you already have. As we age we don't produce the same amount of hormones as we did early in life. All that means is that fitness gains may be harder to achieve. It does ...


1

The general consensus is that testosterone levels start to decline around age 30, with the average being about 1.5% per year. This is one possible reason. Along with this, consider the likely life scenarios. In your 20's, especially for professional athletes, you are in the "hungry" phase, where you are trying for that next contract, pay raise, endorsement ...


1

Sarcopenia. A five syllable word, a fancy way of saying 'use em or lose em'. Fact is, people who do not exercise past the age of 35 can expect to lose 1% or so of their body muscle mass on an annual basis. Weightlifting and jogging are not options. Weight lifting and jogging as you age will keep you out of wheel chairs and assisted living centers until the ...


1

More than a year has passed. This is what eventually worked for me: isometric exercises with tennis balls. I built up slowly each third day, from two to four sets of five to ten "reps", where a "rep" here means five seconds squeezing hard a tennis ball in each hand. I recommend that approach to anyone in the same situation as me. Maybe it worked well ...


1

What works for me is a slower and more cautious progression. Coming back from a shoulder injury, I started with three sets of five dips. I could have done many more, but I took it super slow. The next workouts looked like this: Three sets of five again Three sets of six Three sets of six Four sets of six, since I wanted more volume but felt that my form ...


1

I used to have problems with my grip half a year ago, so i started to train my forearms to increase my strength in my grip. Some excercises i added on my arm day to increase my grip strength - seated-palms-down-barbell-wrist-curl 4 sets of 25 reverse-barbell-curl 3 sets of 15 I use gloves to get a better grip so the weights don't slide off. I consider ...


1

Not for me. I'm 41 and returned to the gym about 8 months ago. Workout the same way I've always have before. And people have noticed that I'm getting bigger. So all good.



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