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16

Take a look at this article on Alcohol and Nutrition Facts. It's pretty long, so I'll try to summarize the high points. Unlike proteins, carbs, and fats it cannot be stored by the body, so it takes precedence over all other metabolic functions. The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase helps in metabolizing alcohol, but what it can't metabolize is absorbed by the ...


16

Short answer: no. Longer answer has to do with a bunch of factors. First, after drinking a liter of beer, you are drunk--if not tipsy. You don't have full motor control, which means you can end up hurting yourself or others without intending to. There's a good chance you'll get kicked out of the gym (unless you own it). Second, alcohol dehydrates you, ...


14

I often heard myself that beer itself can be considered an isotonic drink. I quote some interesting parts of this Royal Society of Chemistry's article, maybe the studies the DailyMail talks about are those linked at the bottom. [Beers] high water content more than compensates for its dehydrating effects. […] One other fact about beer that may come ...


8

The calorific density of alcohol is almost as high as fat, but it is metabolized quite differently. The body is able to metabolize alcohol in a variety of ways. The enzymes involved in these pathways are found in their highest concentrations in the liver. The liver is able to convert alcohol into fat through at least two metabolic pathways, the process is ...


7

Alcohol contains 7 calories per gram, ~70 per fluid ounce, and ~100 per jigger1. It is converted in the liver to acetate which is given priority in metabolism in the same way that carbs & protein are given priority over fat2. As long as you properly count the calories in the alcohol you drink, you should be able to work it in to your diet.


5

Fat: 1 gram = 9 calories Alcohol: 1 gram = 7 calories Protein: 1 gram = 4 calories Carbohydrates: 1 gram = 4 calories Alcohol is almost as calorie dense as fat. You will have to exercise harder to burn those calories when drinking alcohol than when eating the same amount of protein or carbs. But it's nearly impossible to exercise after drinking because ...


5

I personally NEED to exercise the day after. I feel like it helps to clean out my body and makes me feel refreshed afterwards. And when I drink it's at least 4-5 drinks, maybe beer, hard alcohol, wine, etc. Seems like you cramp up due to dehydration, which is cause by drinking. Try drinking water with/after the alcohol, then have plenty in the morning ...


3

From Training With a Hangover, by Bill Starr: I made it a point to push them to personal records on several of the exercises in the program for that day. I wanted to show them that they did have control over their bodies, even when they wanted to throw up or just go lie down on the sit-up boards. But, he also says it's not a good idea to make a habit ...


2

I don't know if alcohol is the main reason. I heard that one or two glasses of red wine a day is healthy for a man. But just like Berin said alcohol is just empty calories. I do think changing your diet will help you over come the weight plateau. My suggestions are: Try to eat slow carbs and up your veg and fruit intake. Try to eat regularly and take ...


2

I recently started a similar training regime... and I am very fond of alcohol. My trainer recommends that I can have a glass (or two) of wine on days when I haven't worked out (so that I am not impeding the recovery process) and I don't have a workout scheduled for the following day (it tends to affect my performance, particularly on the more dynamic ...


2

Alcohol used and estrogen have been linked in several studies, but most of those have focused on postmenopausal women. Still there is good reason to believe it would have a similar effect on a man. Here's a good summary of why that would be bad for your work outs.


1

The Paleo framework starts from the perspective that most people will find that grains, legumes, dairy, being anti-social, getting no sunlight or exercise, and eating too many carbs for their exercise level will be problematic, for genetic and epigenetic reasons. That being said, here's the Paleo test at its most bare: Does it cause you gastrointestinal ...


1

IMO, with alcohol, the extra calories are really not the main thing to worry about. There are a lot of other changes going on in the body. Here's a good place to start. Are you ok having a drink every now and then? Sure, I don't see a problem with that. But a spirit every night might not be what you need on a diet (or even off a diet). Especially on a ...



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