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4

It simply has to do with the location of the muscle in relation to the skin surface vs. bone. Superficial - muscles you feel through your skin--the outermost layer Intermediate - muscles sitting between the superficial muscles and the deep muscles Deep - muscles closest to the bone--the innermost layer. See Superficial Muscles of the Human Body for more ...


4

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


3

You would probably benefit from having a physical therapist's or chiropractic evaluation. If you prefer to try to figure it out on your own search the site for piriformis for more information. Since you've identified the bumps as the PSISs, and you reproduce your pain by rotating your foot (actually the hip into internal or medial rotation), look at the ...


2

Exrx.net gives some nice help in understanding anatomy and kinesiology as it relates to exercise and weightlifting. In addition to their basic exercise and muscle directory, they have several pages that help you understand joint movements, proper alignments, specific muscle weaknesses, and the physics of the movements. The Articulations directory links you ...


2

I very much doubt you are experiencing coldness coming from as far inside your body as your kidneys are. It is most likely just your skin. If the air is cold I guess the sides of your body would experience an increased flow of cold air over them making them cooler than the front of back of your body. I'm only making an informed guess but I would think if ...


1

The vastus medialis is made up of two parts. It has a long part called the VML - vastus medialis longus And it has a more distal part closer to the knee which you appear to be describing called the VMO - vastus medialis obliquus. (Whether or not they are actually one muscle or separate is not fully known.) This VMO video explains why the muscle may not ...


1

According to this article, Muscle growth starts about 1 hr after a workout and continues for up to 24 hours. It is important to have sufficient protein and slow release carbs to ensure maximum muscle synthesis.


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I found a relatively deep article here I hope it can help you


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Assuming there is sufficient room in your cubicle/home office, I would suggest getting an appropriately sized Swiss ball to sit on. In general you'll be moving around slightly while on it, which will help stimulate your core stabilisation muscles. It's also quite easy to do a back bend over the ball, which would be a good idea to do throughout the day to ...


1

I recommend you check the book Strength Training Anatomy. It has images and details for each exercise and the muscles involved and their names. You can "click to look inside" to get a feel of what it is about.



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