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9

Any fitness regimen can be done by women. As far as the gains, that is going to be highly personally dependent. Another woman (or even man) might increase every few days, someone else might only go up every couple months. It will depend on many factors, only one of which may be nutrition. Training history, regular sessions, proper form/technique, proper ...


8

The main differences between the two is the philosophies behind it, and how they are designed to work. First and foremost, it is important to realize that Paleo does allow carbs, just not grains and legumes (or anything that grows underground). Atkins Is a ketogenic diet. It puts your body in a safe version of a fasting state so that your body turns fat ...


4

Berin Loritsch is mistaken in that Atkins would be meant only for weight loss. It is meant for prolonged use as well as any reasonable diet. In Atkins you drop the carbohydrate intake to max of 20 grams per day for two weeks. After that you start gradually adding carbohydrates to your diet until you reach the point where you stop losing weight. Then you ...


4

Within a few weeks, you'll start noticing increased muscle definition. This will depend upon your body fat: the less fat you have the easier it is to see muscle definition. Your low carb diet will probably throw you into ketosis, and you're probably calorie deficient (although that's a big assumption), so you'll be doing a lot of fat burning. You will ...


3

Atkins is a ketogenic diet. I've never heard of anyone taking days to "carb up" on a ketogenic diet, but I haven't heard of everything, and the Cyclic Ketogenic Diet apparently takes this approach. A very high intake of carbs will stop the ketosis and switch you back to carb-fueled energy, and it typically takes 3 days to switch back to ketosis. The amount ...


3

The Cyclic Ketogenic Diet involves carb loading (usually measured precisely so you do not carb overload) in order to allow you to perform in the gym. This is an intrinsic part of the diet, and if you don't carb up and go to the gym, you won't be doing CKD. However, it's certainly possible (whether it is recommended is another thing) to be on a diet that ...


2

Absolutely. Muscle and strength gains will vary from trainee to trainee, but there is no reason not to begin a program like this. Being on an Atkins diet will likely make it a bit more challenging to increase hypertrophy. I would recommend getting in some complex carbohydrates in the hours after you train. (potatoes, yams, rice, oatmeal, etc) You need to ...


2

Not being able to you in person, it is hard for me to say what this is doing to your body. I can say that after 2 weeks, the majority of your strength gains can be attributed'neural' adaptations. Meaning that your brain has become more efficient at sending messages to the working muscles. After 6 weeks, a higher percentage of your strength gains will be as a ...


1

There are many differences between the two diets but I think one of most defining is the kind of animal foods you are encouraged to eat. The Paleo Diet emphasizes lean game meat. You're not going to be eating a marbled steak or bacon on the Paleo Diet. You're going to be eating things like salmon, halibut, venison, bison, organic free range beef, pork, ...



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