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5

Thanks for providing the information about your workout. I agree with @Informaficker that the best way to deal with a back problem is to seek professional expertise. Lots of people have back pain and lots have advice about what worked for them. However, all back pain is not alike and there are many contributing factors, so treat your condition as unique. ...


5

Summit Medical Group has some great rehabilitation resources. Here are some strengthening and stretching exercises they recommend for people with low back pain. On the page linked above, they also suggest sports and activities to avoid, as well as activities that are good for people with lower back problems.


4

There is some evidence that using an exercise ball as an office chair may do more harm than good (source: PubMed). This study found that there was a higher level of activation in the low back muscles on an exercise ball than on an office chair. This doesn't sound like such a bad thing, but according to the authors: It seems ... that low-level activations ...


4

I have had several friends who have lost significant (75 pounds) by doing the paleo diet alone and didn't exercise due to medical conditions. Paleo Diet Lifestyle is a good website to get started. As for exercising, what exactly is your disc problem? I am not a physical therapist, but as a nurse, I would recommend doing whatever kind of exercise you can ...


4

Its funny I had something happen like this to me many years ago. My back would ache when I jogged for a certain amount of time but I was able to play soccer and basketball with no pain at all. I went and saw a dr about this who referred to a orthopedic dr. It turned out to be the following combination of things: I was overpronating basically my foot was ...


4

Stretch it. Toe touches and forward bends are a great way to stretch the back out. There are also a ton of Yoga poses that can help you stretch your back in various ways (I recommend checking out yoga.about.com, which has a ton of poses that you can filter by anatomy). You can do these before, during, and after the concert to help your back feel better. ...


4

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


4

Some people believe that concentric ab work is unnecessary. Abs, by Mark Rippetoe outlines the common reasoning and alternatives to concentic ab work. Here's some summary and excerpts. The primary role of the abs is isometric stabilization. "Since the basic nature of correct ab function is isometric, the exercises in which the abs perform this function ...


3

Most likely your back doesn't hurt because it's weak, it hurts because it is overused. Why is it overused? In a lot of chronic cases (which seems to be your case as well), our back - which main function is stability - has to cover for joints that are not doing their job. The joints I speak of are the one below (our hips) and the one above (thoracic ...


3

If your current fitness/strength level is low, then my suspicion is that you are experiencing muscle cramps due to increased demands. There are a few things I would suggest for rehab: First, deal with the cramping. Yes, massage works, and many massage therapists have special oils that really help the muscles to relax. If you can't afford the massage ...


3

Wearing raised heel shoes and running with a form that lands on the heel first can aggravate your back. I am a software developer also (for 30+ years) and, in 2009, was 85 pounds overweight and walked with a cane due to a hyper mobile lumbar disc. An article by Dr. Rossi led me to suspect my footwear was a contributor to my problem. I switched to Vibram ...


3

Your back problem Your back hurts because the myofascial lines on your back are overstretched. This is caused by your daily movement pattern. I guess you do a profession with a lot of sitting or light standing work? The one thing you should NOT do is stretch them even more or doing some abs exercises like sit-ups or crunches. This will make the pain in your ...


3

Based on Barbie's excellent answer, I suspect we should view the exercise ball exactly for what it is: a ball to exercise on. It might help you train to get a better posture, which is useful for when you sit in a regular chair, but it isn't meant as an alternative for your permanent seating. In your specific case: pain while sitting is never a good sign, ...


3

I have a similar problem that was waking me up from sleep because of thepain, yet I could walk reasonably ok. The Chiro popped it in place which brought some relief, but it lasted less than two days. Doing a bit of research, I found that the best way for me to pop the hip back is actuall very simple. Lie flat on your back with arms spread wide. Legs ...


3

I have had back issues my whole life - mainly lower back. When I was lifting heavy, squats and deadlifts threw me fits. You getting close to about double your weight. This is where it gets a bit tricky for some. What surprises me is that you are not having the same back issues squatting. I think you need to take a step back here and think long-term ...


3

Build up to full pullups with a slow progression, allowing not only the muscles but the supporting tissues to grow together. That probably means you don't start with full pullups right off the bat. Here is one sample progression from Convict Conditioning, along with standards for progressing to the next level. The specific exercise are described in the ...


3

When "software engineer" and "upper trapecius contractures" are written side to side, they powerfully ring a bell. This is quite common. Many hours seated, hunched, with no attention to your body because your mind is debugging subroutines... Cycling won't probably help (your legs may be moving, but you are seated and hunched over the bicycle...) but ...


3

You're probably not maintaining a neutral spine as you attempt to perform your crunches. Be mindful of what you're doing with your head and upper back/cervical spine as you execute the movement. Filming yourself while you perform this exercise (from the side would probably be most beneficial) and looking at your spinal flexion will help you determine whether ...


3

I have had the same sorts of issue with my back some time ago. I really don't know what is wrong with your back, and can thus only speak from my own experience. I have used an exercise ball at work for some years and it has helped a lot. I also have a height-adjustable desk and stand up approximately 50% of the day - I do not have a regular office chair any ...


2

If you will do some research, you will find that a Doctor of Chiropractic [DC] is highly trained in spinal manipulation - far more than a MD. Self spinal manipulation can be very dangerous and cause serious injuries. If you want to help your spinal condition, learn proper rehab exercises designed specifically for your condition by a DC or PT. Counsult a ...


2

First off, I'm not a doctor, and you seriously should talk to yours to see if they can come up with a more permanent solution for you. However, depending on how badly out of place it is, you can sometimes put it back by sitting on the floor on your butt with your feet out, legs straight, then spread your legs apart. If it's badly out, this could fail and you ...


2

Yes, it can cause lower back pain, groin pain, abdomen pain, and other pains. eHow has an article with some very good exercises to loosen the muscle and relieve much of the pain. It walks you through: the Side Plank Leg Lifts Ball Squats Lunges Hamstring Curls the Ball Raise


2

All disc problems are not alike. Some are bulging discs. Some are ruptured discs. The best way you will know what exercises are safe for your back is to have physical therapy. Your therapist will evaluate your back and symptoms. They will correct muscle imbalances, soft-tissue and joint restrictions, and teach you corrective exercises as well as self ...


2

I would definitely consult a sports doctor about this problem. It could be a result of any number of conditions or a combination of conditions. However, here is a list of issues that have caused lower back pain in my experience, in no particular order, with remedies where possible: Herniated disk - surgery and/or VAX-D Degenerative disk - surgery Tight ...


2

If your back pain didn't start until you began the running program then it is likely that your back and spine cannot handle the compressive forces of running with your extra weight. You may need to begin with something less jarring like walking, biking, running in water, using an elliptical trainer or walking with nordic walking poles. Also, you may need a ...


2

I recommend reading the information at the National Insititute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases A part of their website that sticks out to me is: Can Back Pain Be Prevented? One of the best things you can do to prevent back pain is to exercise regularly and keep your back muscles strong. Four specific types of exercises are ...


2

The fact your back is stiff and painful in the morning suggests inflammation as this builds as we sleep for a number of reasons. Combined with the fact you find extension of the back releaving and have most probably been compressing your lower back when weight training, I would suggest it is most likely an annular strain or tear of your intervertebral disc. ...


2

Technique is important for the deadlift. My personal experience is that it is too easy to add weights and once you get above your body weight, small errors increase the chance of back injuries. For the correct posture and technique, see this OP Physcial Fitness: What is the correct form for deadlift? and this two videos: Deadlift set-up and Deadlift back ...


2

My qualification for answering this I am no fitness expert beside being involved in sports even before teen years. In my teens and early adult life i would train 4 to 6 days a week, until I started working. I am also a software developer, and been in industry for way more than an hand full so I can relate easily to you. Short answer Yes. Anything is way ...



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