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6

Dr. Stuart McGill, who that article sites, is probably the worlds leading expert on back health and abdominal strength. He has stated quite adamantly that sit-ups and crunches are unsafe for the back, so if you are looking to minimise your risk of lower back pain and injury I'd be inclined to agree with everything he has to say on the matter. One of McGills ...


6

The loss of height from compressed discs is most likely negligible even over the long term. Over the course of a normal day spinal discs will compress, but spring back during normal sleep. Even under high loads, the spinal discs will spring back relatively quickly - this being part of their primary function. Regarding weight loss and height loss, I've never ...


5

Hyperkyphosis - hunched back-, due to muscle imbalance, is normally caused by weak mid back muscles (rhomboids, part of traps, levator scap, etc.) and tight pectoral muscles. This is common in high school age wrestling athletes for example. Seated rows, shoulder shrugs, rotator-cuff exercises; while paired with pectoral stretches can help correct this. If ...


5

Swimming is an excellent cardiovascular workout. You can give a very strong effort, and since there is minimal body impact, you can give a pretty intense workout just about every day. It most definitely will help with fat burning, assuming that you are eating an appropriate, healthy diet. It will assist in muscle building, but only so much as it takes to ...


4

You can lay down flat on your stomach and then lift your feet up. You don't only lift your toes off the ground, but you also lift your feet up to the point where your knees are also leaving the ground. You then repeat this for several repetitions. This will cause you to feel a certain burning sensation in the lower back muscles. The idea is, once you feel ...


4

Bent over rows are not bad for your back when you are used to handling the weight. However, when your bent over row (AKA Pendlay Row) is pretty close to your deadlift weight, as happens on SL5x5, then it's hard to balance it all out. For example, I'm an over 500 lbs deadlifter and can comfortably row 200 lbs for reps. Get too much over that and and I'm ...


3

You say you're stuck at your lat-pulldown, but you want to be able to do chinups. Well, lat-pulldowns don't make good pull ups, pull ups do. So let's just take a look at the bigger picture and concentrate on your upper back instead of just lats. With that said here are some ideas on how to overcome your plateau: Plan for a dedicated 'upper back day' and do ...


3

When "software engineer" and "upper trapecius contractures" are written side to side, they powerfully ring a bell. This is quite common. Many hours seated, hunched, with no attention to your body because your mind is debugging subroutines... Cycling won't probably help (your legs may be moving, but you are seated and hunched over the bicycle...) but ...


3

Build up to full pullups with a slow progression, allowing not only the muscles but the supporting tissues to grow together. That probably means you don't start with full pullups right off the bat. Here is one sample progression from Convict Conditioning, along with standards for progressing to the next level. The specific exercise are described in the ...


2

The truth is that you can build upper body strength and muscle using only your body weight. Marco is right! You can at least invest in a pull-up bar. You can try this workout: Plyo Push-ups Chin-ups enter link description hereChair Dips Plank Pelvis Crunch Side Plank Pelvis Crunch Try to perform 3 sets of 12-15 reps (work your way up) 3 days per ...


2

Check out Neanderthal No More - The complete guide to fixing your caveman posture! by Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson. It's available on T-Nation and cited all over the web. It deals directly with your (and my) issue. The 4 part T-Nation version has lots of Q&A from readers. @Grohlier gives a very succinct summary of this article which has tons of ...


2

I would do a weight that you know you can keep your posture as straight as possible. If your entire body is jerking too and fro, you won't be putting as much tension on the muscles, middle back, lats, biceps, and you will start incorporating "helper" muscles or nearby muscles to help you complete this movement. Isolation and good form will yield better ...


2

They both are correct, although the one with Coleman where he moves slightly doesn't really add much, and does add slightly higher risk. The theory is that by leaning forward on the eccentric phase you can get a greater stretch on the lats, and thus a better exercise. However, what you are really doing is simply changing the angle of the upper arm in ...


2

The fact that body-building stunts growth--or worse, actively makes you shorter--is a myth. It likely grew out of the fact that over-aggressive weight-lifting can cause injury to the ephiphyseal (i.e., "growth") plates in those who have not finished growing. But injuring a growth plate doesn't actually stop that bone from growing, it simply creates a ...


1

Sit ups can be bad for you back! http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/want-a-stronger-core-skip-the-sit-ups Planks are great. Captians Chair is good too. But the number one exercise for core strength IMHO is squats. Counter intuitive perhaps, but they work for me. I have a dodgy back (hasn't needed surgery yet) and squats help quite a bit. But don't ...


1

I too have had spinal surgery. Besides constant core work, I also perform yoga type stretches twice per day. I think it's important to add stretching into any fitness routine as you age since flexibility can limit your range of motion. For exercises, I think it's best that you decide what works for you.


1

I can tell you what my physical therapist advised as exercises after a lumbago. If this is really adequate to your needs, I can't know. However I seem to suffer from a weak core also. I can do 100 crunches, but completely fail at a plank. I was advised to do the following exercises - Ithink they are fairly safe even with previous injuries, because there is ...


1

The symmetry problem impacts a lot of people. Anyone who has an injury generally only has it on one side of their body (a torn ACL in the right knee, a torn rotator on the left from a couple of years ago, etc). So a lot of standard training paradigms apply to you, as you noted in your question. Barbells are fantastic strength training tools, arguably the ...


1

Awareness The first step is to discover the sensation of a flat back, of firing your lower back muscles, of arching your back, and of keeping or losing your back arch while the hips move. Practice "supermans" on the floor, lifting your legs and chest off the ground. Get into what you think is proper position, then feel with your hand or look in a mirror. ...


1

You're looking for exercises to bulk up without special equipment. So first of all I would advice you to buy some dumbbells because they offer the resistance you will need to bulk up. Sure you can create a well defined upper body using only bodyweight movements but your goal is to bulk up, so you need resistance. You need to trigger your muscle fibres in ...


1

I would just like to add in on Grohliers answer, it might just be a typo but it should be addressed. I agree with stretching the lower back and strengthening the abs, but by stretching the glutes and strengthening the hip flexors you would just "reset" the back stretches and abdominal work. Just google "lower crossed syndrome" and you will get a lot of ...



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