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6

Bent over rows are not bad for your back when you are used to handling the weight. However, when your bent over row (AKA Pendlay Row) is pretty close to your deadlift weight, as happens on SL5x5, then it's hard to balance it all out. For example, I'm an over 500 lbs deadlifter and can comfortably row 200 lbs for reps. Get too much over that and and I'm ...


6

Dr. Stuart McGill, who that article sites, is probably the worlds leading expert on back health and abdominal strength. He has stated quite adamantly that sit-ups and crunches are unsafe for the back, so if you are looking to minimise your risk of lower back pain and injury I'd be inclined to agree with everything he has to say on the matter. One of McGills ...


6

The loss of height from compressed discs is most likely negligible even over the long term. Over the course of a normal day spinal discs will compress, but spring back during normal sleep. Even under high loads, the spinal discs will spring back relatively quickly - this being part of their primary function. Regarding weight loss and height loss, I've never ...


5

Hyperkyphosis - hunched back-, due to muscle imbalance, is normally caused by weak mid back muscles (rhomboids, part of traps, levator scap, etc.) and tight pectoral muscles. This is common in high school age wrestling athletes for example. Seated rows, shoulder shrugs, rotator-cuff exercises; while paired with pectoral stretches can help correct this. If ...


5

Swimming is an excellent cardiovascular workout. You can give a very strong effort, and since there is minimal body impact, you can give a pretty intense workout just about every day. It most definitely will help with fat burning, assuming that you are eating an appropriate, healthy diet. It will assist in muscle building, but only so much as it takes to ...


4

You can lay down flat on your stomach and then lift your feet up. You don't only lift your toes off the ground, but you also lift your feet up to the point where your knees are also leaving the ground. You then repeat this for several repetitions. This will cause you to feel a certain burning sensation in the lower back muscles. The idea is, once you feel ...


3

You say you're stuck at your lat-pulldown, but you want to be able to do chinups. Well, lat-pulldowns don't make good pull ups, pull ups do. So let's just take a look at the bigger picture and concentrate on your upper back instead of just lats. With that said here are some ideas on how to overcome your plateau: Plan for a dedicated 'upper back day' and do ...


3

The truth is that you can build upper body strength and muscle using only your body weight. Marco is right! You can at least invest in a pull-up bar. You can try this workout: Plyo Push-ups Chin-ups Chair Dips Plank Pelvis Crunch Side Plank Pelvis Crunch Try to perform 3 sets of 12-15 reps (work your way up) 3 days per week with one day of rest in ...


3

Check out Neanderthal No More - The complete guide to fixing your caveman posture! by Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson. It's available on T-Nation and cited all over the web. It deals directly with your (and my) issue. The 4 part T-Nation version has lots of Q&A from readers. @Grohlier gives a very succinct summary of this article which has tons of ...


3

When "software engineer" and "upper trapecius contractures" are written side to side, they powerfully ring a bell. This is quite common. Many hours seated, hunched, with no attention to your body because your mind is debugging subroutines... Cycling won't probably help (your legs may be moving, but you are seated and hunched over the bicycle...) but ...


3

Build up to full pullups with a slow progression, allowing not only the muscles but the supporting tissues to grow together. That probably means you don't start with full pullups right off the bat. Here is one sample progression from Convict Conditioning, along with standards for progressing to the next level. The specific exercise are described in the ...


3

The barbell row really is a terrific exercise right up until (for me) you start going over your bodyweight. So if you're 180lb, having 180lb's of bar+plates tends to be pretty heavy primarily because you're probably already doing a lot of other lower back exercises. A big advantage to barbell lifts (vs bodyweight) is that you can incrementally change your ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


2

I would do a weight that you know you can keep your posture as straight as possible. If your entire body is jerking too and fro, you won't be putting as much tension on the muscles, middle back, lats, biceps, and you will start incorporating "helper" muscles or nearby muscles to help you complete this movement. Isolation and good form will yield better ...


2

They both are correct, although the one with Coleman where he moves slightly doesn't really add much, and does add slightly higher risk. The theory is that by leaning forward on the eccentric phase you can get a greater stretch on the lats, and thus a better exercise. However, what you are really doing is simply changing the angle of the upper arm in ...


2

The fact that body-building stunts growth--or worse, actively makes you shorter--is a myth. It likely grew out of the fact that over-aggressive weight-lifting can cause injury to the ephiphyseal (i.e., "growth") plates in those who have not finished growing. But injuring a growth plate doesn't actually stop that bone from growing, it simply creates a ...


2

I think you'll find over the long term, that one exercise is no better than the other at building the "V" shape you're after. Having said that, I'd add that we all tend to have one or more exercises that tends to really work for a particular body part. That's just part of genetics and being an individual. I would stick with what works for you while ...


2

I've had good luck with the Iron Gym Pull Up bar. It does require a standard-size door with a reasonably secure/level lintel and a few inches room on either side (much to my chagrin, I only have one door in the house where this applies, a bathroom). It costs about $25-30 in stores, but they show up fairly often on Freecycle for free, or on Craigslist for $5 ...


2

As far as I can tell, the word for the sound is Crepitus, although this not only describes "popping", but also "grating" and "crackling". While not necessarily pathological itself, many conditions actually do lead to that kind of sound. If it's especially the "popping" that interests you, the wiki on cracking joints seems to adress this. Different processes ...


2

I recommend the olympic style front squat: The front squat is the king of exercises for the thoracic spine. It will give you perfect posture, and will get you strengthening and extending your upper back like nothing else. To perform this exercise, it means getting the flexibility in your lats to keep your elbows up during the lift. Notice how her ...


2

Your physical therapist would probably be the best one to answer that question. Because there are different causes of kyphosis, the results of doing your corrective exercises may very well depend on the cause. If the cause of your kyphosis is postural, then strengthening the upper back and scapular muscles while adding flexibility to the shortened muscles ...


1

A very good exercise for biceps and back is the chin up. The primary cause of injuries is ego/pride. Going for a new max weight in heavy exercises like deadlifts. As long as your exercises are controlled, the risk of injury is small. Stretching has no benefit in injury prevention or soreness prevention, in fact it will make you weaker and thus more likely ...


1

Congrats on deciding to take control of your health and fitness. If this is your first foray into training, you may wish to consider bodyweight exercises first. There's relatively little cost and your chance of injury is minimal, but, not zero. If you'd still like to purchase a home gym, you should research each machine you're interested in before making ...


1

If it must be at home, then it really depends on the architecture and furnishings of your house. My friend's place has a floating beam in the living room, which is not bad for doing pull ups on. I don't have such a beam - not everyone is going to have something at home that's satisfactory for pull ups. So that's when you need to check out places outside of ...


1

If you don't have anything to use that will give you a good grip, you'll need to buy/steal/borrow something. You can build your own for roughly $20. You can also spend $25 and get a cheap pair of rings (nice ones will set you back ~$40-$50). With those you can do levers, dips, pullups, muscle ups, shoot throughs, and much else.


1

If you have access to a barbell and rack, do some of the recommended items of back squats and deadlifts. Those alone will make a phenomenal difference in your back strength. They're tremendously valuable compound lifts. They're also somewhat technical so find some good tutorials or books (Rippetoe is someone I personally recommend). Start with lighter ...


1

There is something called as horizontal shrugs; which can be seen in this link; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3cupvX9mv4 This can also be conducted while lying on a bench too. It is a great exercise, and you don't need much weight to do it. Instead, try to go for high reps, such as 10-20; and hold that weight for a little moment at the top (like 1 full ...


1

Sit ups can be bad for you back! http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/want-a-stronger-core-skip-the-sit-ups Planks are great. Captians Chair is good too. But the number one exercise for core strength IMHO is squats. Counter intuitive perhaps, but they work for me. I have a dodgy back (hasn't needed surgery yet) and squats help quite a bit. But don't ...


1

I too have had spinal surgery. Besides constant core work, I also perform yoga type stretches twice per day. I think it's important to add stretching into any fitness routine as you age since flexibility can limit your range of motion. For exercises, I think it's best that you decide what works for you.



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