Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Dr. Stuart McGill, who that article sites, is probably the worlds leading expert on back health and abdominal strength. He has stated quite adamantly that sit-ups and crunches are unsafe for the back, so if you are looking to minimise your risk of lower back pain and injury I'd be inclined to agree with everything he has to say on the matter. One of McGills ...


3

Bent over rows are not bad for your back when you are used to handling the weight. However, when your bent over row (AKA Pendlay Row) is pretty close to your deadlift weight, as happens on SL5x5, then it's hard to balance it all out. For example, I'm an over 500 lbs deadlifter and can comfortably row 200 lbs for reps. Get too much over that and and I'm ...


3

You say you're stuck at your lat-pulldown, but you want to be able to do chinups. Well, lat-pulldowns don't make good pull ups, pull ups do. So let's just take a look at the bigger picture and concentrate on your upper back instead of just lats. With that said here are some ideas on how to overcome your plateau: Plan for a dedicated 'upper back day' and do ...


3

When "software engineer" and "upper trapecius contractures" are written side to side, they powerfully ring a bell. This is quite common. Many hours seated, hunched, with no attention to your body because your mind is debugging subroutines... Cycling won't probably help (your legs may be moving, but you are seated and hunched over the bicycle...) but ...


3

Build up to full pullups with a slow progression, allowing not only the muscles but the supporting tissues to grow together. That probably means you don't start with full pullups right off the bat. Here is one sample progression from Convict Conditioning, along with standards for progressing to the next level. The specific exercise are described in the ...


2

I would do a weight that you know you can keep your posture as straight as possible. If your entire body is jerking too and fro, you won't be putting as much tension on the muscles, middle back, lats, biceps, and you will start incorporating "helper" muscles or nearby muscles to help you complete this movement. Isolation and good form will yield better ...


2

They both are correct, although the one with Coleman where he moves slightly doesn't really add much, and does add slightly higher risk. The theory is that by leaning forward on the eccentric phase you can get a greater stretch on the lats, and thus a better exercise. However, what you are really doing is simply changing the angle of the upper arm in ...


1

Sit ups can be bad for you back! http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/want-a-stronger-core-skip-the-sit-ups Planks are great. Captians Chair is good too. But the number one exercise for core strength IMHO is squats. Counter intuitive perhaps, but they work for me. I have a dodgy back (hasn't needed surgery yet) and squats help quite a bit. But don't ...


1

I too have had spinal surgery. Besides constant core work, I also perform yoga type stretches twice per day. I think it's important to add stretching into any fitness routine as you age since flexibility can limit your range of motion. For exercises, I think it's best that you decide what works for you.


1

I can tell you what my physical therapist advised as exercises after a lumbago. If this is really adequate to your needs, I can't know. However I seem to suffer from a weak core also. I can do 100 crunches, but completely fail at a plank. I was advised to do the following exercises - Ithink they are fairly safe even with previous injuries, because there is ...


1

The symmetry problem impacts a lot of people. Anyone who has an injury generally only has it on one side of their body (a torn ACL in the right knee, a torn rotator on the left from a couple of years ago, etc). So a lot of standard training paradigms apply to you, as you noted in your question. Barbells are fantastic strength training tools, arguably the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible