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6

It is smart to look at fitness when you are young with an eye on preventing problems as you age. Back pain can have multiple causes. Some of the causes stem from degenerative changes of the joints, restrictions in the soft tissues (muscle and fascia), protective muscle spasms, disc degeneration and/or prolapse, and osteoporosis (weakening or thinning of ...


5

If you are doing it in proper form, it'll build your middle back, lower back, glutes, legs and it'll also help strength the sides of the abs. Your shoulders and traps should see almost no change. You do get your traps sore because of all the weight that is resting on top of them but you are not putting them under tension. If you want to build your ...


5

Chinups (palms towards you) do activate your biceps more, but not at the cost of your lats. There's a bit of bro-science about pullups/chinups, but if you read a 2010 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research it tells a different tale. Basically, the recruitment of the latissimus dorsi is the same: A general pattern of sequential ...


4

You're spending too much time benching light and doing heavily-counterweighted "pull-ups". Instead of doing 36 light bench press reps and 3 or 4 heavy reps, do 15 to 25 heavy reps. Three to five sets of 5 at 175 sounds about right. Every week add a pound or three or five. Doing that a few times a week, plus eating and sleeping well, should have you ...


3

Other than bracing your midsection, you shouldn't be using abdominals at all in that exercise unless your form is very poor. The abdominals main function is to either curl the upper torso towards the hips, or to curl the hips towards the chest. The big violator in either of those exercises is usually the lower back extensors, as people lurch backwards to ...


3

Both exercises will work your back significantly. It is really up to preference, I know a lot of guys who solely do pull ups to build a huge back as well as ones who solely do lat pulldowns. Both have recorded similar progress and gains. However, pull-ups activate your core muscles significantly as well, a missing plus of lat pulldowns. However for bicep and ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


2

Your physical therapist would probably be the best one to answer that question. Because there are different causes of kyphosis, the results of doing your corrective exercises may very well depend on the cause. If the cause of your kyphosis is postural, then strengthening the upper back and scapular muscles while adding flexibility to the shortened muscles ...


2

I recommend the olympic style front squat: The front squat is the king of exercises for the thoracic spine. It will give you perfect posture, and will get you strengthening and extending your upper back like nothing else. To perform this exercise, it means getting the flexibility in your lats to keep your elbows up during the lift. Notice how her ...


2

As far as I can tell, the word for the sound is Crepitus, although this not only describes "popping", but also "grating" and "crackling". While not necessarily pathological itself, many conditions actually do lead to that kind of sound. If it's especially the "popping" that interests you, the wiki on cracking joints seems to adress this. Different processes ...


2

The lower back is the failure point of back squats, and gets a lot of work out of them. So yes, back squats build the back. Are back squats the best for the lower back? Not always; I find deadlifts slightly better for maximal loading, and weighted back extensions somewhat better for hypertrophy, but squats are a great middle ground. I find that doing ...


1

"Listen" to your body. If you feel pain during exercise (not one of lactic buildup in muscles), with or without injuries, it's best to immediately stop. Make sure you are doing the exercise properly and that you don't have an underlying condition that limits your ability to perform the exercise safely. That being said, I'm occasionally doing twists, ...


1

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by straight back without pictures (do you mean generally, or when they're holding specific poses?), but I know in some gymnastic based programs, they recommend training a position called the Hollow Body position. It involves flattening the back against the ground with resistance provided by the rest of your body. My ...


1

The position is pretty extensive on the knees. This video suggests to use a block under the hip not to damage the knees here where the practioner sits inbetween the heels (not on top of the heels). However, there are many different varieties to the position such as internal thights wide and sitting on heels here and sitting on heels with thighs side-by-side ...


1

It sounds like you are doing everything that can be done to help your condition. The best I can do is to give you ideas for inspiration. 1) Get the right chair. Since you are sitting down all the time, there might be some special chairs that can help sit in a better position. 2) Change setting position every so often. Maybe once every 30 to 60 minutes 3) ...


1

The squat affects the following muscles: Erector Spinae Although you may not think of the squat as a back exercise, the erector spinae muscle group contracts isometrically -- without shortening and lengthening -- during both the downward-movement and upward-movement phases of the exercise. The erector spinae group includes the iliocostalis, ...


1

If you watch the animation that you posted closely, I think you'll see two important adjustments to consider. First, make sure that the seat is correctly placed to target the lats. You'll notice in that animation that the top of the chest pad is at the top of the chest. That's a good guide for adjusting the seat. You don't want the seat too high or too ...


1

I agree that lat pull-downs and pull up-variations are superior for developing a so-called "V-shape." When doing pull ups, engage in thorasic extension (puff your chest out) and pull your shoulders back. Keeping these parts of your body stationary will allow you to better isolate your lats. Rows are also essential if you want to develop a "thicker look," ...


1

In answer to your title question, no. They both involve all of the muscles listed above. A chin-up focuses a bit more on the biceps whilst pull-ups distribute more effort across the back. Changing the width of your grip will focus on different parts of your back. But in the end, your body is doing the same amount of work over all of those muscles you listed. ...


1

Many exercises can cause back problems if done improperly. The bent over row with a dumbbell is not an exception. However, if done correctly, the bent over row is a good, compound exercise that strengthens multiple back, shoulder and scapular muscles. To protect your spine: Keep your back slightly arched and avoid rounding your back. Contracting ...


1

No, as long as you maintain proper form, it's not dangerous, the only back problems you'll have is "how can I find clothes that my huge back fit into". Every exercise put a strain on some joint and could thus be potentially dangerous. To me, it's a lot easier to maintain a neutral back while doing dumbbell rows than during a deadlift.


1

Well, I would ask you this simple question : What is the point of your training ? Is it doing as many reps as possible, or is it building more muscle ? I would guess the second one is your concern. In that regard, what you are looking for is destroying you muscle fibers in order for your body to overcompensate for your losses. Remember this : When it ...


1

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245055 "subsequently, chinups seem to be a more functional exercise" Anddd there you have it. Personally, I see greater carryover from pull ups (Wide grip) compared to either for back development. But I utilize all of them. Typically, pull ups/chin ups are my first exercise on back days until I can't do anymore, then ...



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