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6

Bent over rows are not bad for your back when you are used to handling the weight. However, when your bent over row (AKA Pendlay Row) is pretty close to your deadlift weight, as happens on SL5x5, then it's hard to balance it all out. For example, I'm an over 500 lbs deadlifter and can comfortably row 200 lbs for reps. Get too much over that and and I'm ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


3

The barbell row really is a terrific exercise right up until (for me) you start going over your bodyweight. So if you're 180lb, having 180lb's of bar+plates tends to be pretty heavy primarily because you're probably already doing a lot of other lower back exercises. A big advantage to barbell lifts (vs bodyweight) is that you can incrementally change your ...


2

I think you'll find over the long term, that one exercise is no better than the other at building the "V" shape you're after. Having said that, I'd add that we all tend to have one or more exercises that tends to really work for a particular body part. That's just part of genetics and being an individual. I would stick with what works for you while ...


2

Your physical therapist would probably be the best one to answer that question. Because there are different causes of kyphosis, the results of doing your corrective exercises may very well depend on the cause. If the cause of your kyphosis is postural, then strengthening the upper back and scapular muscles while adding flexibility to the shortened muscles ...


2

I recommend the olympic style front squat: The front squat is the king of exercises for the thoracic spine. It will give you perfect posture, and will get you strengthening and extending your upper back like nothing else. To perform this exercise, it means getting the flexibility in your lats to keep your elbows up during the lift. Notice how her ...


2

As far as I can tell, the word for the sound is Crepitus, although this not only describes "popping", but also "grating" and "crackling". While not necessarily pathological itself, many conditions actually do lead to that kind of sound. If it's especially the "popping" that interests you, the wiki on cracking joints seems to adress this. Different processes ...


2

I've had good luck with the Iron Gym Pull Up bar. It does require a standard-size door with a reasonably secure/level lintel and a few inches room on either side (much to my chagrin, I only have one door in the house where this applies, a bathroom). It costs about $25-30 in stores, but they show up fairly often on Freecycle for free, or on Craigslist for $5 ...


1

If you don't have anything to use that will give you a good grip, you'll need to buy/steal/borrow something. You can build your own for roughly $20. You can also spend $25 and get a cheap pair of rings (nice ones will set you back ~$40-$50). With those you can do levers, dips, pullups, muscle ups, shoot throughs, and much else.


1

I started today a new inverted row cycle by lowering one step the bar and trying 3x3 and failed. It is simply too hard. Going back by raising the bar a step and 3x15 makes not much sense, I think, since I am already able to do that I think the training variables you can control are intensity, volume, and muscles worked. Since increasing the intensity ...


1

A very good exercise for biceps and back is the chin up. The primary cause of injuries is ego/pride. Going for a new max weight in heavy exercises like deadlifts. As long as your exercises are controlled, the risk of injury is small. Stretching has no benefit in injury prevention or soreness prevention, in fact it will make you weaker and thus more likely ...


1

Congrats on deciding to take control of your health and fitness. If this is your first foray into training, you may wish to consider bodyweight exercises first. There's relatively little cost and your chance of injury is minimal, but, not zero. If you'd still like to purchase a home gym, you should research each machine you're interested in before making ...


1

If it must be at home, then it really depends on the architecture and furnishings of your house. My friend's place has a floating beam in the living room, which is not bad for doing pull ups on. I don't have such a beam - not everyone is going to have something at home that's satisfactory for pull ups. So that's when you need to check out places outside of ...


1

If you have access to a barbell and rack, do some of the recommended items of back squats and deadlifts. Those alone will make a phenomenal difference in your back strength. They're tremendously valuable compound lifts. They're also somewhat technical so find some good tutorials or books (Rippetoe is someone I personally recommend). Start with lighter ...


1

There is something called as horizontal shrugs; which can be seen in this link; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3cupvX9mv4 This can also be conducted while lying on a bench too. It is a great exercise, and you don't need much weight to do it. Instead, try to go for high reps, such as 10-20; and hold that weight for a little moment at the top (like 1 full ...



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