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11

Given the additional information you've posted, it sounds like you are simply hitting a wall. Those are good numbers on the squats and deadlifts, so it's possible that you're not recovering (perhaps from too little sleep?), but it doesn't sound like that's the case. I would see if switching to 3x5 instead of 5x5 allows you to progress. When I started with ...


10

Between this post and the prior one asking for 5x5 squat help, I strongly recommend seeing a qualified personal trainer and also your Dr. for a physical prior to any more exercising. Based on your posts, you're overweight, out of shape and do not have a background in weightlifting, this is a combination that could get you SERIOUSLY injured. Stop, get a ...


9

Keep in mind that the bench and rows are using smaller muscles than the squats and deads. However for the rows to be that far behind the bench tells me you started the bench higher than the program would otherwise specify. In truth your rows should be another 20lbs heavier than your bench. There are usually two reasons why you can't make a lift: The ...


7

In my opinion, the dumbbell bent over row is a superior exercise for the following reasons: Your body is better supported--making this more desirable if you have chronic back problems It builds your grip much better than the barbell variation It keeps the shoulders, elbows, etc. in a more natural position. Now, in order to perform the dumbbell row ...


4

Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


2

The only real difference is that the Pendlay row is a stricter version of the bent-over row. Important: the assumption is that you are not doing what's referred to a "Yate's Row" where you body is at an angle to the ground instead of parallel with it. Main distinction: Bar returns to the floor every rep. (lifting from a dead stop)


2

1) It's safe, but you need to be a bit more careful about form/technique. You can pretend that there is an imaginary bar that keeps the dumb-bells at a constant distance apart as you do the exercise. 2a) Bent-over Row with dumb-bell Keeping good form is a little more difficult. You activate the secondary stabilizing muscle groups more (which is good). As ...


2

It's easy to make the argument that a plate has only one requirement: to weigh a certain amount. However, round plates enable a range of exercises that are impractical with any weight that has straight edges. Any floor exercise: i.e. rows, deadlifts, cleans Any exercise that requires rolling: i.e. barbell ab rollouts The difference is significant enough ...


1

Since upright rows stress the traps and the shoulders, I would switch to using barbell or dumbbell shrugs. Your shoulders won't get as much work, but, if done correctly, the traps should benefit. Additionally, either exercise should reduce any strain on your wrists.


1

For other people experiencing this same issue who can't or don't want to receive help from a personal trainer - I was experiencing the same issue after squats - a sharp lower back pain that seemed to get worse if I drove for long periods of time or sat down at work all day. The thing that has helped me the most is stretching or rolling out my hip flexors ...


1

@Joshua - I read your question, your updates, the response (I completely agree with Dave and Berin) and kept coming back to your #'s. It seems your out of balance between the different lifts and being 200lbs + the bench is far below where it should be - especially based on your systematic approach, focused diet, etc. What is missing from your information ...


1

I'll bet anything you have long arms and a fairly small chest. As a result, both the bench press and the row are a lot harder for you than for someone with shorter arms. Just set lower goals for those two movements, you'll never push/pull as much as a guy with T-Rex arms and a Donkey Kong chest.


1

I would also highly recommend to add chin-ups as an additional exercise. This will help with the lats development needed for both bench press and barbell rows and grip strength needed for deadlifts. The original Stronglifts 5x5 had chin ups after deadlifts and dips after barbell rows.



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