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6

(Possible) Reasons Why You Squat More Than Deadlift Your form is bad in both exercises. Without a video or someone checking your form, this can't be (dis)proven. You don't like deadlifting; as a result, you (probably) apply minimal efforts to it. If you want to be good at deadlifting, you've got to perform it more often, enjoy it (or at least pretend), ...


5

It's likely all the bench-pressing that you're doing. Too much volume: 10x10 is a very high-volume program. Most lifters stick to around 3x10 or 4x8 for hypertrophy. It also might be a muscle imbalance. Your pectorals are stronger than your back-muscles, and it's screwing with the (very complicated) structures in your shoulders. Take a break from ...


5

This topic can be as divisive as whether training deadlifts with straps is effective or not. Since powerlifting is my background, and powerlifters tend to be the biggest proponents of the false grip (AKA suicide grip), I'll attack the question from that perspective. Beginners Have no reason to use a false grip on bench press. There's too much they need ...


4

It does both. The amount of chest involvement depends on the width of your hand placement. Experiment with that and make note of where you feel it in your chest most. Flat bench also works your shoulders, primarily the anterior delts The further inclined you are the more you hit the mid and rear delts as well All barbell bench variations will involve ...


4

The shoulder is an amazingly complex joint that allows for a very wide range of motion. The point of the rotator cuff is to keep the ball joint in the middle of the shoulder girdle. It is a stabilizing muscle, not a primary mover. I think it's a big mistake to treat rehab exercises like you would strength exercises. When a physical therapist prescribes ...


4

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


3

TL; DR: The unwrapped position is called the "suicide grip". 'Nuff said. While you state that if the bar rolls, your thumb won't stop it, the thumb gives you enough control over the bar that you are much less likely to roll it. And realistically, if you are at all worried that you might lose control of the bar, you should be using at least one spotter. (You ...


3

Can You Bench Your Friend? Theoretically Yes......but I think the biggest problem you'll face is your friend lying still like a barbell. Since humans instinctively fight for control when they're off balance, it might be relatively hard for you to keep your friend in the air. Another problem will be the "handle bars". What regions of your friend will you ...


3

The major muscle groups in any variation of bench press are the pec major and minor, and the triceps (with various other muscles playing stabilizing roles). In general, the narrower one's grip, the more the triceps tend to become the primary mover. The close-grip bench press is, indeed, a vary popular accessory for people who have weaker triceps. In ...


3

This form is wrong because your stability is bad. It's very important to keep a stable & core-involved position during your bench press, which means contracting your abs and keeping your feet on the ground, pushing through your heels. Personally, I can affirm that my bench quickly improved by about 10 pounds since I started following this approach. It ...


3

While you will see a lot of people doing this it is incorrect form, especially if you are lifting heavy weight, your feet should be planted firmly on the floor and will help you maintain your balance.


2

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


2

Congrats on joining the big plate club! When it comes to progressing at several different exercises, there's really no magic to it. You just make sure you do both of them. I don't know what kind of program you're using, but for someone with a small frame such as yourself, I'd probably do a full-body program, or at most a 2-split (leg day, upper body day). ...


2

Unracking the bar should be a slide and not a lift. The bar should be at arm's length when at the tip of the rack. Some hinges have a lip at the end, which of course has its own uses. I guess it's for safety, but I think that's accomplished just fine with a straight plug at an angle which slopes into the rack. Anyway, the same principle applies. When the ...


2

"Down and Back" This is a common cue meant to tell the lifter to keep their shoulders locked into position so that the shoulder girdle remains open throughout the lift (to avoid impinging any tissues). An easy way to feel this while standing or sitting is to raise your arms so that both your upper and lower (forearm) arm are parallel to the ground. Now ...


2

I highly recommend reading the following two articles by Paul Carter: Developing Your Raw Bench Part 1 Developing Your Raw Bench Part 2 They cover all that you really need to know about the bench press, and is a fairly comprehensive guide. However, to answer your specific question: I fully extend my arms when bringing the barbell up from my chest, ...


2

Cost benefit analysis: If thumbless is more comfortable, you might conceivably lift a few more pounds. If the bar slips out of that grip, unless your spotters ALREADY had a grip on the bar (ie, it was already not a real lift (google "Clemson 640 bench." Perfect example of a non-lift.)), its gonna mash your face/neck/ribs before they even have a chance to ...


1

It would depend on the grip and the width of that grip on the swiss bar. The suprispinatus abducts the upper arm (Moves it away from the torso), so if you do a swiss bar with a wide grip, you are still going to need to move the upper arm out to accommodate. The primary thing the swiss bar would achieve is rotation of the grip (And thus the forearm), which ...


1

Stretching chest for any long wont make it look better or bigger. Ppl do it bc how these exercices make'm feel after. I do stretchs for warm up. With elastics or low weight. 15-20sec. Little advice. If you keep doing your 15sec don't hold breath for that long. If you do it standing, stretch abs and keep'em contracted all along these 15 secs. Then you will ...


1

Yes it is possile, with good genetics and certain body leverage advantage. Look up Jesse Norris and Larry Williams. He might not be good at other things though.


1

In most cases, yes, triceps can affect your performance on chest exercises. Any exercise that involves some sort of pressing the weight away from you will use your triceps to some degree. However, the wider your grip is, the more emphasis will be placed on your chest. Flyes are an example of a chest exercise that place very little emphasis on the triceps (...


1

It sounds like you already had some good progress. Hitting a milestone like that 135 lb bench is a real validation of the work you've put in. You have two questions, but one of them I think you have more concerns with. Relative Strength The concept of equating the effort that a 150 lb young man does with a 230 lb man does is actually a fairly complicated ...


1

Bench press works mostly chest, incline bench works both to the same extend (45 degree angle) and overhead press works mostly shoulders. You can see the worked muscles in the order of percentage involved here: Bench press Incline bench Overhead press


1

I've had my foot slide out from under me due to the floor being too dusty. I train in a garage, so that's always a concern. I've also had the hamstring pull due to factors other than what's immediately obvious. In your case, a good part of it was probably due to the foot slipping and suddenly loosing tightness on one side. Paul Carter has a great article ...


1

To answer your question, its highly debatable. Some factors you may want to consider:- How heavy did you train, in this case did you go heavy for your bench or did you go light? How much volume(sets/reps) is done on that day(for your bench)? Are you eating in a surplus(eating more than your maintenance). How fast can your body recover(physical and central ...


1

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


1

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


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Upper lower imbalance It's actually quite common on stronglifts/starting strength/etc Few factors at play here. You are consistently doing a heavy lower body lift first every single workout. The first exercise you do in a workout when you're fresh will tend to be the most effective. For some that means that latter exercises progress slowly because they ...



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