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17

Take a look at this article: The Athlete's Heart. Looking at your exercise regimen, I think you are more of an athlete than you realize. Just biking the 8 miles a day has you putting on at least 40 miles per week of aerobic exercise. The article states that with a heavy aerobic exercise regimen, the heart responds by lowering its heart rate, but ...


15

No, don't support your weight on your arms Your hands simply aren't really made for supporting all that weight. If you ride for long like that, you'll see white or red areas on your hands where pressure has affected blood flow. It's also likely to exacerbate repetitive injuries from keyboarding. Gloves can only help a little. It's ok to be sitting very ...


11

The main indicator of "fat burning" in different exercises boils down to your rate of calorie burn, and how long you maintain that rate. Cycling is not a bad way to lose fat by that metric, since as you get trained up you can maintain a reasonable rate of burn for quite a long duration. Cycling burns (depending on the speed/amount of effort) several hundred ...


10

Running is just one means to the goal of fitness. Personally, I haven't been running in any serious capacity for 22 years since I tore my Achilles tendons (yes, plural, as in both at once). Any activity that keeps your heart rate elevated (~70% HR Max) for 30-45 minutes at a time will do. Keep get in a enough sessions to total 120 minutes a week and your ...


9

I suspect uncomfortable butt issues will get you first, before you ride far enough to do anything to your legs. (Intriguingly, I have been told it is actually the little hairs on your butt pulling and tearing as you sit that cause the discomfort. I always figured it was about building muscles there to sit on vs bones/fat). However, absolute mileage is ...


9

I've asked this implicitly of two qualified personal trainers. (One of the two usually trains Olympic athletes, so I trust his judgement.) Each time I said that I was interested in weight training to balance out the extra workout that my quads get (not just in the lower body, but to bring up my upper body strength too). Both of them said it was a reasonable ...


9

Fat loss will come from eating less calories you consume, and the easiest way to create a deficit is through your diet. The biking is a great supplementary activity, but it will be extremely difficult to add mileage or begin additional jogging without consuming more calories to make up for those activities. Adjusting your diet while maintaining your current ...


9

Short answer, there is a health risk from increased intake of polluted air, but the health benefits outweigh the risk. Funnily enough, you are exposed to a higher concentration of pollutants driving, but for a shorter amount of time and at a lower respiratory rate. Overall, air pollution exposures experienced by car drivers were modestly higher than ...


8

Before you significantly burn fat, you have to put enough demands on the body's biochemistry, and cycling is excellent. More of that bodily response below, but first note that cycling slowly (6-11 mph) burns Calories equal to roughly 1/4 of your weight in pounds per mile vs 2/3 your weight walking or running. Of course, less stress on joints, tendons, etc. ...


8

The classic school of thought is that cardio == 40-60 minute periods at 2/3rds your heart-rate or so, as explained above by Christopher. On the other hand, I've personally (I'm about the same size as you) had much more luck with some HIIT methods, specifically Tabata; the research for it is compelling and I've seen the results on myself as well. Tabata means ...


8

This is whats happening: I'm still growing. You are thirteen, and say you are classified as 'overweight', so I'll assume you are talking about your BMI and aren't considered 'obese'. Usually metrics like this are calibrated for adults, usually for males and are based on limit studies. BMI is useful at the population level and can be a useful metric in ...


7

I'm all for the minimalist shoe movement. I wear Merrell Trail Gloves almost exclusively, including at my standing desk at work. However, there is something to be said for using the right tool for the job, and for biking VFFs are not the right tool for the job. That's not to say you can't wear them, especially if you have cage or platform pedals on your ...


7

[I will treat this from a purely mechanical point of view, as this is my area of expertise -- the actual body mechanics are much more complex, but the effect is similar.] From a mechanical point of view, the most efficient way to propel yourself on the bike is to step on the pedal so that the distance between your heel and the pedal is maximized. Ideally ...


7

Heavy barbell squats. A lot of people are very wary of squats, thinking that they will damage their knees. The truth is, properly performed squats do the opposite - they strengthen the muscles around the knee, providing more strength and stability. Bonus: proper heavy squatting will help you build muscle all over your body, even your arms! The dangerous ...


7

One way of looking at aerobic function is as the bodies ability to burn fat for fuel at a given pace or speed. Anaerobic function then is the bodies ability to burn sugar for fuel when we move beyond the pace at which we can burn primarily fat. Heart rate is often a good indicator of which mode we're in. Intervals and speed training, then, burn mostly sugar ...


7

Well I'd recommend you to cycle the way you feel most comfortable with. I would recommend you to cycle at an average pace to work and decide daily how you want to cycle back. Maybe you need to relieve some stress or aggression, so just bite your handlebar and go full speed. Maybe you are exhausted already anyway, so just keep it slow. Cycling 18km daily ...


7

Immediately after (like within 30 minutes or sooner) dump a bunch of protein into your system. I like chocolate milk, but anything with protein and carbs and fluid is good. This helps your body recover faster as it starts off will all the raw materials it needs. If you can handle it, a cold bath (ice cold is optimum, but very hard to take) can help reduce ...


6

This is going to depend on the course you do, what gear you stay in while cycling, how severe your bursitis is, etc. It's impossible to say for sure, particularly if your bursitis was caused by injury. All that said, my basic suggestion would be "proceed with caution". It will be important to be as light on yourself as possible. The cycling motion is ...


6

+1 for squats. Lunges are another good biking power builder. I tend to mix running stairs with squats to provide a little variation. Riding on the road can help you build fitness too. Generally speaking, road riding is lower impact than mountain biking, which allows you to log some serious miles without the off-road pounding. As far as training on the ...


6

You definitely do NOT want to be supporting your weight with your arms on the bike for normal riding. One exception would be while on a time trial or triathlon bike, where it is best to support your weight with your upper body/arm skeleton structure to save your legs for running off the bike. During non-TT riding, your weight should be primarily on the ...


6

As I understand it, you want to expand beyond the "power stroke" and consider pedaling in a "full circle". Starting just past the top of the stroke around 1:00 you would drop your heel slightly then gradually extend you foot somewhat during the power stroke, then extend it further at the bottom, sort of "flicking" the pedal across the bottom. Then, you ...


6

There can be any number of causes for pain in and near the joints. There is a lot of connective tissue (tendons and ligaments) in major joints, as well as the cartilage and synovial fluid that lubricates the joints. These general rules of thumb will help you diagnose what's going on: No pain, but the sound of "cracking". This is usually a harmless ...


6

I'm more into cycling for fun (allowing the benefits of the exercise to be somewhat accidental) rather than short, intense rides aimed specifically at calorie burning like you seem interested in. Hopefully somebody more into your specific goals will give a better answer than I can. You might also have good luck asking more specific cycling questions on ...


6

Stocking up a couple of days before hand on complex carbs (pasta etc) is a good idea. Do not eat loads and loads more, but do get extra carbs into the muscles, (storage). Not working hard (exercise wise) for 3-4 days at least before hand will give you the energy and rest needed to do your best. If you are not sure at this point then in all honesty things ...


6

I really doubt that you have a palm muscle problem at all. The palm of the human hand has very little muscle (basically just a muscle for the thumb and for the little finger[1]), with no muscles in the middle of the palm. Most of the muscles for your fingers are actually in your forearm. More likely things: You compressed the medial nerve in the carpal ...


6

If you eat enough food to offset the energy you spend cycling, you won't lose weight. One basic approach might be to estimate the number of calories you're spending (there are several online calorie estimate tools for cycling out there on the internet), and make sure to eat that much additional food per day. Track your weight, and adjust the amount of ...


5

I have a new enemy and its name is CHEESE Believe it or not, this is some what common. It frustrated me for quite some time before I found the cause. DAIRY. I used to have a cup of greek yogurt every day as well as some quantity of milk and ice cream throughout the week. Every single time I would get in the pool, I would be annoyed with phlegm. Try ...


5

It depends on your general fitness level, what kind of bike you have and where you are driving. I stopped mountainbiking about 10 years ago and didn't do any other sports. When I started again 4 months ago a trip of 20km (12.4 miles), road only, took me a good hour and I was pretty exhausted. The first tour of 30km some days later really killed my legs. Now ...


5

Basically, just ride. Don't tear after it, just get used to the bike and being on the saddle for a time. I would suggest that for the first few times, at least until you get used to the bike and how it feels, that you stay close to home and do loops around a park or something similar. The last thing you want to do is decide "I'm going to go ride 20 miles", ...


5

By gaining weight, I think you meant gaining lean muscle mass! And if this is your main concern, then here are a few rules you need to follow: Lift weights - especially heavy weights by focusing on the major muscle groups like chest, thigh, butt, back and core. Try squats, deadlifts, benches, chin-ups, bent-over rows and lat pull-down machine next time ...



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