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Assuming you mean weight (resistance) training when you say “Gym”, you're actually comparing two somewhat different, but, complimentary activities. So, if at all possible, why not do both? As Alec states, your worry about a “gym body” is unfounded for the reasons he lists. However, that should not discourage you from participating in an exercise program ...


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For either of the two to deliver the weight loss you want, a fair amount of discipline is required. Assuming the same level of discipline with either, I think buying a bike would deliver the best result. This is not so much a cardio vs weights thing, as you can clearly do some cardio in the gym, but it is much easier to make cycling regularly part of your ...


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A few misconceptions here. You will never ever get that "gym body", so don't worry about it It sounds harsh, but it's true for a few different reasons. It's hard to achieve in the first place. You need to put a LOT of time and effort, and even money into it, in order to get the "gym body". A lot of people try, and don't succeed, even WITH the time and ...


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Marathon recovery for me is generally very very easy jogs, riding a bike, walks, stretching 2-3 times a day, drinking water, and massages. Specifically stretching, massages, and light 30 min workouts of the affected muscles simply to get blood flowing in them are the keys in my opinion. Its kinda funny that the best way to recover from this is to do more ...


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Meetup is a useful place for meeting people with similar goals. Most towns, especially college towns, have a local running club; surely you can Google around for more info. Or inquire at your local running store. They're usually very familiar with the local clubs and events. The track club in my college town even led a marathon training program every ...


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Option d) Get lucky and find a bunch of slightly overweight but otherwise well trained and motivated guys who took it really easy uphill for the majority of the course and some huge teams near the end to draft. Was struck by the competition devil and did lead for quite some distance but tried to keep my peak pulse below 160 bpm. No issues up to 3:00 and ...


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I think you should c) not do something you aren't ready for. Sorry to be a bummer, but unless you've worked up to a level where a 120 km bicycle race seems like a fair challenge that might be difficult but not too far outside of your comfort zone, trying to force it seems like setting yourself up for either disappointment, injury or a very long recovery ...



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