Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Try paleo and read up on intermittent fasting. Or better yet, check and see if the "bulletproof" diet does anything for you. It's main shtick is a quick but filling breakfast, that leaves you with enough energy until your next meal. It does go far beyond that and offers a lot of ideas on nutrition and exercise in general. I can't promise you that it works, ...


1

While you could blame genetics, biking up enough hills and eating enough food will get you big legs. Nothing to be done about that. So don't do that. If you want less leg muscles, you need to burn them. You want to train longer at a lower intensity. You also want to consume less protein so that your body can't build new muscles and ultimately can't maintain ...


0

Yes and no. Assuming total caloric output would be the same, the results will be similar, but different. There are three components to consider: strength, muscle endurance, and aerobic cellular respiration. See this answer for a more detailed explanation of these factors. Let's keep strength a constant in this case to keep it simple. As the resistance ...


0

If you're squatting full depth 260lbs, I doubt it's a strength issue. I used to race competitively (road and mountain), and I can offer up a few places to get started. 5MPH is extremely slow. Like so slow that you can almost tip over because you're not carrying enough velocity to track in a straight line. At a good clip a hiker with a full pack can move at ...


0

It sounds like your legs have a hard time buffering the lactic acid build up you get from cycling. You might have a lower percentage of slow twitch muscle fibres in your legs than the average person, which could effect your endurance. What about carbohydrate intake ? If you are lacking sufficient glycogen content in your muscles it will definitely have an ...


1

From what you've said I'm assuming the volume in your legs is largely muscle, but also with thighs the size of an olympic cyclists, presumably a somewhat significant level of fat. Achieving this size due purely to muscle is very difficult. (This is however a big assumption, so please correct me if I'm wrong.) The 10lbs gained during training is likely due in ...


0

Some of the effects of cooler temperature might have on your cycling are: cold air is denser than warm air ... increasing aerodynamic resistance your tire pressure will be lower if not adjusted ... increasing your rolling resistance your tire rubber compound will be harder ... decreasing your grip you'll likely be wearing more clothing ... increasing your ...


0

Cycling is harder in the cold for one big contributing reason: you didn't put in extra pressure into the tires to compensate for the pressure drop. If you inflate your tires indoors, you have to think about the temperature difference. That 25 degree indoor air going into your tire will turn into 10 degree air. This gets worse with lower temperatures. Keep ...


0

I am sure the size of your legs is a combination of genetics and hypertrophy from the exercise you have participated in. I agree with the taking in less calories. You will lose weight, but there is no guarantee where the weight will come off. I would working getting leaner overall through exercise and diet, but at the same time learn to accept your legs as ...


0

Hitting the wall means that your liver is running out of glycogen. This doesn't mean that you are completely out of energy, because your body can still burn fat. But burning fat is a harder way to get energy. In order to improve your body's ability to deal with hitting the wall, you should go on some longer rides 1-2 times per week and cycle until you hit ...


1

To answer your question regarding gears, yes if you are planning on cycling on varying inclines and terrains then you will need gears. Also regarding tyres, for road cycling you are better with a smoother thinner tyre, do off-road cycling (like in the woods etc) you would need thicker tyres with deeper grooves. I'm not sure where you live, but in the UK ...


-1

You have to sit on the actual seat and see for yourself Jitendra. A good rule of thumb is when you are seated on the bike that one of your legs is able to hang completely straight with no bend and hook into the pedal. Hope that helps, Mike



Top 50 recent answers are included