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You really should state your age when asking such a question. If you're still growing, we will have to take a different approach towards guiding you, than is the case if you're fully grown. If you're an adult, it's really quite simple: If you consume fewer calories (energy) than you burn (through exercise etc), then you will lose weight If you consume as ...


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Your reliance on "going for some runs at night" makes me think you're not focusing on diet and nutrition. Track your calories, drop most of the carbs, stength train, get a physical sport/hobby, and up the protein. It's a lot of life modifications but it's the only long term path I know of that works. Welcome to getting older.


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10 mets on a bicycle is the equivalent of ~ 14 mph. This is a fairly easy pace and should be easy to sustain for a while, unless you have never really ridden a bike much other than a beach cruiser around the block. Here is a link for a met exercise equivalency chart, there are dozens of them scattered around the web that show MET's for various exercises. ...


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Actually, fat does float. There is a manswers episode about how girls with big natural boobs float.


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I've just had this done as a part of a range of tests through a program run at my job. Essentially the company involved does what they call a "Health Screen". You'll find many by doing a search for that term. As you can see from this link here showing packages, body fat % is a standard even on the basic one which is pretty cheap. As well as the consultation, ...


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Step one is to fix your diet. You will have to say no to pizza, burgers, and chips until you hit your goal. That alone will help you start losing fat. The question is whether it's enough fat to hit our goal. The best way to illustrate what I mean is to use an example. Person A is 200 lbs at 20% body fat. That means 40 lbs of fat and 160 lbs lean mass. ...


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The only really accurate way to determine if you're gaining (or losing) fat is with a water tank. Fat floats, bones and muscle sink, and fluids don't really have much of a difference. Armed with that folks can figure out pretty accurately how much fat you have. That of course is incredibly unrealistic for 99.9% of the population. If the only exercise ...


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Personally I wouldn't sweat your body weight. You'll find most muscular people will end up on the "obese" side of a basic BMI chart. Muscle weighs a lot more than fat: I'd make these adjustments: Flip to a solid program, away from a routine. Starting Strength gets a lot of love and is considered by many to be the most effective strength training program ...



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