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A very well thought out question. First, the technical term for holding your breath is called the Valsalva maneuver. In the world of weight lifting it has a distinct purpose: to increase the body's ability to protect the spine under heavy load. The Valsalva maneuver does not work alone. There's a pretty fair treatment of the subject on a Rebock Crossfit ...


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I think in answer to your question, it's going come down to what is your starting point? Are you new to lifting or been lifting for some time? Have you had any joint weaknesses? This article seems quite useful:- http://www.symptomfind.com/healthy-living/weighted-vest-training/ Also, have you considered resistance bands for working out at home? There's ...


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I can only give an anecdotal answer: I find that the tightness of the core from the intra-abdominal pressure added by a full breath becomes negligible once one develops a very strong squat. I think that for a strong squatter, the ability to move the same amount of weight likely exists regardless of breathing method. In my experience of trying many ...


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No, the cable pull will not be a perfect substitute for a deadlift. Looking at the pictures above, it's very clear that the angle of the cable pull is much different than that of a typical deadlift. As a result, the effects on the engaged muscles will be different from those engaged in deadlift. A traditional deadlift engages your thigh and arms' muscles ...


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I've seen the minute figure pretty consistently. What to do next depends on who you talk to, but a lot of people seem to be suggesting dynamic plank techniques where you start in a plank or plank-like position and transition back and forth using different movements.


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The standard measurement for fitness is 60 - 90 seconds. If you can consistently perform plank (with good form) for this duration without breaking a sweat, it's time to increase the pressure. If you can really perform 120 seconds without breaking a sweat, it's time to bring out the big guns: Adding weights. Using instability balls.


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First off, you're referring to reps, but the plank is an isometric exercise. For that reason, a single plank might better be seen as a set. Another view I'd like to offer is that the actual time you do the plank might be more suited to be likened to reps. Rough example of what I mean: 120s bodyweight plank would improve mainly endurance -> low intensity ...



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