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7

Alcohol has many detrimental effects in the body, and you cannot replace carbs with it. Lowers Growth Hormone and Testosterone Inhibits recovery Causes dehydration Lowers muscle glycogen Decreases aerobic capacity It is caloric, but non-nutrient Alcohol has a catabolic effect on protein synthesis; the result is lower muscle mass/smaller gains, but it ...


6

Nathan, first, please check out this answer on myofibril vs sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. With muscular endurance, you are dealing with (to simplify things greatly) three variables: Myofibril: how many contracting fibers you have in the muscle (e.g., one elastic band vs a bunch of elastic); how strong you are Sarcoplasm: how much stored energy your muscle ...


6

Sports tape to the rescue! My gym used to have the same problem, to the point where some people actually started bleeding. Calluses don't really go away if you work out a lot, and so the injuries inside the hand compounded between exercises like deadlifts, pullups and EZ-curls. The staff at the gym eventually started taping the bars every day because of ...


5

My son asked me to take a look at this question. I'm a second-generation phlebologist, myself the son of the man who coined the word "Sclerotherapy" (=injection treatment of varicose veins) in 1939, and who founded the organization currently called the "American College of Phlebology" (it started as the "Phlebology Society of America", which I ran for about ...


5

There is considerable overlap between these modalities; the physiological changes that occur are very similar, however, the effects differ slightly. From an anatomical point of view: Hypertrophy training is the only modality that stands out when it comes to an increase in the muscle cross sectional area. Training power (slightly) and strength (more so) ...


5

From what I've gathered in various interviews, it looked a bit like this. He would have huge peaks when he was getting ready for a big fight. This is what he reported doing daily, his average training time coming in at 55 hours per week. Run 4 miles. Walk 10 miles. > 2,000 (decline) sit ups. > 500 push-ups. > 500 shrugs with a 30 kg barbell He would do ...


5

I believe it's possible to grow muscle mass and have type-2 diabetes. (I have type-1 diabetes and am an endurance athlete who also does some strength and conditioning work at the gym.) The main assumption I want to challenge is that you need the level of calorie restriction it sounds like you might have. Your carbohydrate intake will have a much, much ...


4

Muscle strains can be tricky to heal, mostly because people won't take the proper amount of time to let them heal properly. Given a full healing cycle, then you shouldn't have any more risk of reinjuring the bicep than any other muscle in the body. You note that the pain is in the center of the bicep, which almost precludes any tendon involvement, so it's ...


4

While you won't be able to do much to impact the actual height of your body through exercise, to help make use of what you do have for height you can do exercises to strengthen your back and shoulders, leading to a more upright natural position which appears taller. Deadlifts are a great exercise to accomplish this; within a few months you should notice a ...


4

Actually, height is largely genetic. However, nutrition is what impacts it from en environmental standpoint, and not exercise (it has a slight effect, assuming you are not a professional powerlifter, marathon runner or the like). So no, you cannot increase height by doing certain exercises. The notion that training basketball or volleyball makes you taller ...


4

The phrase is a marketing slogan. That said, it is based on the principle that if you do the same thing time and time again, your gains will plateau at some point. By varying what you are doing and targeting the muscles in different ways, it will take your body longer to "get used" to a particular routine/exercise, which results in plateauing.


4

It is certainly possible, but IMO has very little practical value as working your arms separately limits you to a couple of exercises. Plus, it may be harder to keep the load balanced so that your arms progress at the same pace. Make sure you eat well and get enough sleep. Fatigue builds up quickly if either of those is missing.


4

I'm a bodyweight training addict. In my point of view doing 1 x 50 is better than doing 10 x 5 because you have the same volume but in less time, you have more intensity. The first commandments in a post of Paul "Coach" Wade about calisthenics mass is "Embrace Reps" and the 4th is "Limit sets" source : ...


4

I think most athletes are familiar with good vs bad pain. Good pain is just soreness, typically DOMS, and not an acute injury that you are aggravating. Good pain also tends to be transitory: it comes up with new exercises or increased load, and then goes away. Also, exercise tends to make it feel better. Bad pain is sharper and tends to be indicative of a ...


3

No. Height is purely genetic. There aren't any exercises you can do that will influence your height.


3

OP: the hamstring doesn't just bend the knee. That's the function at the knee insertion. However, the hamstring ALSO acts as a hip extensor along with the glute maximus. Hence why RDL/Straight-Leg Deadlifts, Good mornings, etc involving a hip hinge with straight-ish legs works to isolate them well. The reason a squat uses the hamstrings is because in ...


3

I rate my training days on a scale of 1-4. This helps me address what I need to do. First the scale: I'm trash. No energy, very diminished capability. The bad side of average. Shouldn't have too many of these. The good side of average. Most training days should be here. I'm superman. Nothing can stop me, better than normal capability. The 1 days ...


3

Alcohol consumption slows your body's mechanisms for metabolizing fatty acids by interfering with the citric acid cycle (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/87483). It essentially bumps fatty acid metabolism down the priority list. This mostly applied to chronic alcohol use, however. So it doesn't just increase in carbohydrates in your diet, but it also slows ...


3

Load bearing exercises combined with a proper diet have been demonstrated to reduce and in some cases reverse bone density losses. Women especially need to be aware of this as decreased bone density can lead to osteoporosis, which impacts women much more than men. Additionally, one of the biggest predictors of hospitalisation and poor health in later life ...


3

How about hurting yourself and be unable to exercise for a long time (possibly never again)? Is that a good reason? And yes, bad forms can easily lead to short/long-term injuries. Programs such as Strong Lifts advocate starting the weightlifting program with an empty bar. This allows you to focus on the form. Then, you increment the weight periodically. ...


3

Pull ups are much harder for women, than for men. Males have significant more muscle mass on their upper bodies than women does, so it is natural, it is hard. That said, focus on assisted exercises to begin with. Grip strength also plays a role, but should come quite quickly for beginners. Rubber-bands Assisted Pull-ups - lift her up by her feet Row ...


3

I was finally able to do pull-ups starting last year. I had previously tried assisted pull-ups and was never able to get up to body weight pull-ups What finally helped me do pull-ups were a few things: 1) instead of assisted pull-ups, try negative pull-ups. You start at the top of the bar and lower yourself down in a slow, controlled motion, lasting 4-5 ...


3

Poor insulin sensitivity, obesity, diabetes. I would use oatmeal and sweet potatoes if you want to get your calories up. Those foods are much better at keeping your blood sugar balanced.


3

You could also try out "Fat Grips". You put them on the bar and have a rubbery feel to them. They can also be placed on dumb bells and regular bars. Their purpose is to make the bar thicker to work your forearms more but they might help with your problem. If you look on amazon you'll find them and many other brands.


2

The most true "opposite" exercise to the push-up is the let me up, or inverted row. These preserve the posture, bodyweight aspect, and arm positioning of push-ups for a true mirror-image exercise. The barbell row's different form (arched back, pulling toward lower ribs) works muscles farther down the back that are silent in push-ups.


2

Straight arm pulldowns work the lats without the biceps. Rear delt flies with the elbows bent at 90 degrees work the traps... or you could just do shrugs.


2

As a man who had the same problem - let me tell you my findings on the matter. Muscle gain is very dependent on your biological makeup. Any weight gain is. What works for 80% may not work for you. I'm at 180 cm height and had 62-65 kg most of my life while force feeding myself and hitting gym 3 times a week (not slacking there, I don't have time to ...


2

Without seeing your form, it's difficult to provide an answer. However, from what you described, I would guess that when doing barbell bench press, you lower the bar closer to your neck instead of closer to your sternum. That would put added pressure on your deltoids. Machines typically make it impossible to perform an exercise with bad from. I would ...


2

If you are already angry then use that. Aggression can be a brilliant tool in the weight room to induce adrenaline. You would be amazed at what you can do in the gym when you are pissed off. Don't stay angry forever though, use it as a stress release to calm yourself and set you up for the day. It really can work wonders.


2

I'm going to start off with that there is no universally best routine. Only what is most appropriate for you given your level of training, physical development, and your goals. Advice in the world of bodybuilding (i.e. hypertrophy work), opinions are so severely divided that it's even hard to compile a list of routines. That's probably due to the fact a ...



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