Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Start at your head, and go to your feet. That's the muscles involved. :p Seriously, a good punch will involve most of the muscles in the body. The primary single movers in a punch are going to be Pecs (Chest) Triceps (Arm) Deltoids (Shoulder) You could throw a punch just using those muscles, but it won't be a hugely powerful punch (Think a jab in ...


8

The "bandages" that "real boxers" wear (whether on TV or not) are called handwraps, and are worn underneath the glove to add stability to the bones of the hand and wrist, as well as to prevent chafing with the inside of the glove. (They are not for soaking up blood inside the gloves, though I guess they do that job too.) I would add three things to your ...


4

It all depends on the way youre training with the bag - the intensity of that training. The same rule apply to running. Basically doing marathons and 100m sprints is running, but they are completely different - just compare a sprinters musculature to a marathon runners. You can treat your boxing sessions as a form of High Intensity Interval Training and ...


4

Boxing is great for conditioning, and is probably even better than steady-state cardio (running at the same pace for a set period of time). If you don't like running for duration, try intervals. Run hard for 60 seconds, walk for 60 second, repeat 10 times (or more, depending on your ability). Interval training has been shown to be more productive at burning ...


4

I agree with Dave about hand wraps, workout time, etc… but I feel you should be able to hit the bag a bit without prior instruction. For your bleeding knuckles, instead of hand wraps - which require a bit of expertise - you can use boxing wraps, they are easier to use and provide good protection. Some other tips: Knuckle push ups. Use a timer (either ...


4

It really depends on how you define "overall fitness". Boxing is an excellent source of cardio training, and a good traininer will have you not only pounding the bag, but running, doing sit-ups, push-ups, chin-ups, bodyweight squats, skipping, and who knows what else. All of these things are going to build some lean muscle mass and will help reduce fat (as ...


4

Nearly everything except eating, resting, and lifting heavy weights slows down muscle growth. So, yes, boxing will somewhat interfere with your bodybuilding. This answer may help. However, it doesn't sound like your goal is "get bigger", it's "get fitter in every way", so your current amount of boxing is fine. Boxing will improve your conditioning, as well ...


3

The person with the higher body fat may or may not be able to throw a more powerful punch. Punching is very technique driven, and a smaller person with better technique will be able to punch harder/quicker than someone with lesser technique. However, if we assume that two individuals have the same technique, the person with the higher body fat may have a ...


3

I boxed for 5 years - the last two professionally. When I boxed - in the projects - it was at a "real" gym. I have also instructed people in classes and "boxing gyms". And I put that in quotes because I was more personal trainer that used boxing techniques and workouts for my clients. Probably in the same category you are in - you aren't looking at ...


3

No. Speed bag work is non-injurious; wraps provide more wrist support, unnecessary on the speed bag. You might lose a tiny bit of mobility depending on the gloves.


3

6 x 3 minute rounds seems a lot for a warm up. I would imagine you would be tired and unable to do a complete weight training program. What are your goals? and why did your personal trainer suggest this program? If your focus is on improving cardio, this might be right, but if it's strength training....you would normally do a light warm up, focus on the ...


2

I'd say it's pretty risky to ask someone to box 6 3-minute rounds before doing weight training. As you said, you feel pretty tired and don't feel like you have 100% energy to do the weights, and as a result you won't be getting the benefits out of it that you could if you were fresh. Not to mention if you're fatigued you're more likely to be sloppy and make ...


2

I am a PhD student in computer science and an amateur Muay-Thai boxer :-) I will not tell you anything about "brain damage" --- because I am not an expert in this topic (though I do not think it is a real problem on the amateur level). I will not tell you that Muay-Thai is a great, fascinating, enjoyable sport, perhaps the best I have ever tried. Because ...


1

Standard comment when people complain about pain when performing their exercise, especially when it involves your head or chest, schedule an appointment with your doctor to be sure it's not a health problem. That said, the idea of recoil is a decent guess. If this is a one-time thing, it's possible that you had a headache that was only becoming evident when ...


1

Your scheme shouldn't just say "Gym". You should make a plan of which muscle groups to work on. As the answer from @DaveLiepmann says, your training might be too much for you, but it might also be fine for you. That depends on your shape - that is, it depends on how fit your body is right now and how well (how fast) it recovers. ...


1

No workout schedule is intrinsically too much. This schedule might be too much for you, just as it may be entirely doable for an elite-level heavyweight kickboxer. If you've been kickboxing three times a week for several months and you're feeling great, then adding one to three lifting workouts might be fine. If you just started kickboxing, or if you ...


1

One good way to gauge exercise effectiveness, based on my own experience, is where you sweat and how much you sweat. When I work out on the heavy bag (and my BOB free standing target), I move like an actual fight, left and right, up and down, punch high with one hand and low with another in a combo, etc., and sweat pours from my stomach, legs, glutes and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible