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34

Having guided a group of 'Start-to-Runners' (similar to Couch to 5K), I'm convinced anyone can get started with running (except those who can't walk properly). A couple of things you should keep in mind: Don't overdo yourself, because if you get injured, you can't run at all and you'll lose any progress you've made. Also, you'll get less muscle soreness, ...


29

I stumbled onto a great resource of swimming information: Swimsmooth.com that happened to have a couple of great tips I'd like to share: 1. Focus on exhaling rather than inhaling. The reason you want to breathe is not because you have a lack of oxygen. You only consume a couple percent of the 20% oxygen you breathe in, no the reason you breathe is to get ...


17

Mouth vs nose Some exhale through the nose, some through the mouth and some through both at the same time. Both is somewhat better (it's faster, deeper and prevents water coming in) but maybe needs more practice to be done properly. Rhythm Anything from 1:1 to 5:1 is very common but 3:1 is considered the most efficient* (3:1 is 3 strokes for 1 breath). ...


12

Although I'm not a smoker and can't comment on that(but here's an interesting link that may apply), I have found though, that if I don't keep up on running, I get the same feeling. Two years ago, I was able to run 10 miles no prob. After getting married and in school full time I haven't ran for a while. I went running the other day, and had the same ...


11

A very well thought out question. First, the technical term for holding your breath is called the Valsalva maneuver. In the world of weight lifting it has a distinct purpose: to increase the body's ability to protect the spine under heavy load. The Valsalva maneuver does not work alone. There's a pretty fair treatment of the subject on a Rebock Crossfit ...


10

Nose has natural air filters for all sorts of things; temperature regulating filters for example. Nasal breathing is very important at cold weather. However, there is a lot of debate concerning the general advice to breath through the nose during cardio workouts. You need a lot of oxygen and maybe nose is too small to deliver enough. Many runners breath ...


10

As an ex-smoker (I smoked for 10 years, 10 years ago) and runner I can remember the feeling of being breathlessness and it was actually one of the motivators to quit smoking along with watching videos of people with emphysema. The way I got into running was first of all having a goal (a half marathon) and initially concentrating on sprinting short distances ...


10

Plyometric exercises are specialized, high intensity training techniques used to develop athletic power (strength and speed). Plyometric training involves high-intensity, explosive muscular contractions that invoke the stretch reflex (stretching the muscle before it contracts so that it contracts with greater force). The most common ...


8

I run only as fast as I can breath through my nose. Our respiratory system is designed such that for any level of aerobic activity in which we regularly participate we can obtain sufficient oxygen by breathing through our nose. I don't know what kind of pace you want to run at, or how long you mean by long distance, so there's considerable room for ...


7

For any breathing under load, the best approach is to use the same technique singers, cheerleaders, and martial artists use: breath from the gut. Look at yourself in a mirror, and if your shoulders are rising and falling when you breath you are breathing from your chest. Your stomach should be moving in and out, almost as if your diaphragm is being moved ...


6

Holding your breath is common, standard, well-accepted powerlifting practice. Hold your breath throughout each rep of squatting, deadlifting, and pressing. Holding your breath helps keep your chest locked. Breathing during the rep encourages you to move your chest, meaning you lose the tightness in your abs, upper and lower back. This invites injury. For ...


6

Slowing down your pace might help, too. I used to have the same problem and hated running. Then I tried treadmill on the gym. At first with very slow speed and then gradually increasing. With this I can keep a pace slow enough to be able to run for 40 minutes without feeling out of breath. It might just be that my "running" is closer to jogging or walking, ...


6

I would suggest working up to running by running very small distances at first during your walks. Walk a mile, run a block, repeat. Gradually increase the distance that you run, but stop if you feel you're overexerting. The goal is to gradually build up your endurance when running and you don't have to be able to sprint the whole 8 miles on your first go. ...


5

Congrats on your weight loss and quitting smoking! I do think your smoking history has something to do with your lungs burning. Your body isn't used to your new lifestyle (you pretty much shocked it by quitting smoking and losing 50 lbs I assume was the same time as quitting?) and it's adjusting. I would suggest letting your lungs heal and letting your body ...


4

I recall learning that breathing in through the nose actually warms up the air you breath before it reaches your lungs, more so than when you breathe through your mouth. This in turn keeps your body temperature better regulated. You could try to exercise when it's warmest outside. However, as long as the air is cold, I don't believe the stinging sensation ...


4

Don't run constantly... I smoke occasionally (definitely not a regular habit but rare occasions like when I drink) and have sports induced asthma (you may suffer from the same). Don't worry, it goes away when you get into better shape. I know how it feels because I have to go through it every time I decide I'm going to start getting back into shape. What ...


4

I don't think it would be possible to hold your breath through a set, so I'll assume you mean whether or not to hold your breath throughout one complete rep. Keeping your lungs full of air helps create intra-abdominal pressure, which stabilizes your core and adds support for a weight above you. I find this to be most crucial when doing squats, but certainly ...


4

Here is a very interesting thread for you where “Star Queen” explains how your breathing pattern during swimming can cause excess air to go into your stomach as you inhale. This can occur especially if you hold your breath followed by gasping or gulping for air, such as in turns and while pushing off the wall or when trying to increase your speed. So the ...


4

I had read to use both mouth and nose, but found that whereas the nose is good at filtering air, it's not very good at filtering the water droplets splashing around. Water up the nose isn't nice. I ended up buying Total Immersion's "O2 in H2O, A Self-help course on breathing in swimming" and it teaches in with the mouth, out with the nose.


3

If you have no heart or lung problems, you're just feeling the difficulty of doing squats. 15 reps is a long set! The program I'm doing has me doing squats at only 3 sets of 5 reps, but at a higher weight. I don't run out of breath, but they're still really hard, and I'm getting stronger. At 15 reps, you're training endurance, and that's why you're feeling ...


3

You have something called the Eustachian tube inside your head: This tube is connecting your middle ear to your nose and throat. When you fly, and the pressure inside your midlle ear is different from the pressure around you, you can feel this difference in pressure as... well... pressure in your ear - either under- or over-pressure. This pressure is ...


3

You should always breathe in through both your nose and mouth and out through your mouth. you cannot get enough of the needed oxygen only using your nose or mouth by itself. You should allow air to enter through both your mouth and nose when you're running. Your muscles need oxygen to keep moving and your nose simply can't deliver enough. Make sure ...


3

For bodybuilding and muscle growth, you want to keep your rest periods relatively short. This approach differs from strength training and power-oriented Olympic weightlifting, in which rest periods of three, five, or even ten minutes is called for between max effort sets. Rippetoe and Kilgore recommend very short rest periods to optimize muscle size: If ...


2

I find that it is better to go much easier during very cold or very hot weather as my bronchial passages have a tendency to get so inflamed that it resembles asthma. Stinging is a sign that your nasal passages don't like what is going on. Perhaps during winter months you might consider spending time on a treadmill at the gym. In my case, the total lack of ...


2

Quite simply, no. In order to understand why, you have to understand the metabolic pathways used in exercise. If there are slight differences in the amount of calories burned, it is due merely to the difference in energy needed to move the lungs. Essentially, your muscles use Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) to perform their work. The different metabolic ...


2

It might be that you're getting your lower body in shape, with the focus on aerobic, but not your upper body - the difference between doing jumps/running and pushups is that you're using your upper body chest, arms, back. Sounds like you need a full body workout plan and one that includes more weight training to increase strength as well as your endurance ...


2

No it's highly unlikely. Sweating has a lot to do with your natural physiology, internal temperature and the climate. You should still be able to get sufficient oxygen just by breathing through your mouth. Either way, you could work on opening up your nose by cleaning it regularly. Doing so in a hot shower helps since the heat will cause vasodilation and ...


2

Okay, so most of these suggestions are relatively disturbing from an exercise science point of view. While I agree that the valsalva maneuver is common place in power lifting it is still dangerous. Internally, when you hold your breath, your inner thoracic cavity pressure sky rockets. It is the reason if someone has an inguinal hernia while weight ...



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