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6

Yes. Your target heart rate is based on a percentage of your maximum heart rate. The formula is: (((220 - Age) - RHR) * 0.7) + RHR This formula will figure for 70% of your maximum based on the Karvonen Method. Your Resting Heart Rate (RHR) should be averaged over a few days (3-5). You should take it upon waking, before getting out of bed, and count total ...


6

According to WikiHow, the Navy's Body Fat calculation formulas are as follows (measurements in cm): men: %Fat = 86.010*LOG(abdomen - neck) - 70.041*LOG(height) + 30.30 women: %Fat = 163.205*LOG(abdomen + hip - neck) - 97.684*LOG(height) - 78.387 I couldn't find a site that actually explains these equations, but I can make some educated guess about ...


4

Given - Outdoor - Completely flat, little wind, similar surface (let's say a rubber track) Indoor - Treadmill flat, same temp as outside, mph/kph calibration is correct (this is hard to prove or disprove but if you are an experienced runner you know if it is wrong) NOTE** Just because a treadmill is on a flat floor doesn't mean you are running on level. ...


4

Calories/hour @ 120bpm - Calories/0.1 Liter * 7 (1 bottle is 0.7L) = your net Calorie gain/loss Running at 120 bpm for 1 hour for someone who's overweight would probably equate to 500 Calories. It depends on your pace and weight whether this accurate. Assuming the calories in your bottle of Meursault is about 90 Calories per 100 ml = 90*7 = 630 Calories ...


3

A warning at the beginning: Calorie Calculation is inaccurate, these calculators only give a rough estimate at best. What to chose depends on what you want to do with the results and if you are planing to count calories for your exercise separately. If you don't want to track your activity, select the light or moderate activity and use that number as a ...


2

A small factor is rounding error. There is probably not exactly 60 g of protein any more than there is exactly 9 calories per gram of every single type of fat. Another may be over-estimation. The could just be rounding up to 300 to provide a nice number or cover themselves, since some chicken breasts may be larger or fattier than others. Finally is how ...


2

Don't rely so much on the 'target' heart rate zones. Lets say the 'fat burning zone' is at 70% of your max, that does'nt mean you'll burn more calories at that rate than if you were at 80%, it means you'll get slightly more benefit per effort you put in. Your NET calories burnt will still be higher at the end of a workout of the same length if your heart ...


2

A 1 - 2 degree incline will give you enough extra resistance to adequately compensate for the reduced difficulty from using a treadmill, however there is no exact calculation for this. The treadmill advantage will vary based on brand, since they will use different belts, and the tread-board can have more or less spring, depending on manufacturer. If you ...


2

You are correct. Running consumes 110 calories per mile. Calories consumed when cycling depends upon the speed at which you cycle (due to air resistance). Cycling at 15 miles per hour will burn just 31 calories per mile. Calories Burned Running Vs. Cycling


2

Consider an example, a person X who's weight is say :90 kg. Then consider another person Y who's weight is also :90 kg. Both have same weight, BUT, X has more lean mass than Y. What does that mean? it means your bodyweight is a sum of different factors: Your body fat mass (fat percentage) Your body muscle(lean) mass (muscle percentage) Your body water ...


2

I keep the protein at around 1 gram per lb. I think 1.5 is too much and costs alot. I also keep fats at around 30% of total calories, where fats are 9 calories. So If I am on a 2200 calorie diet my fats would be at most 70 grams when cutting around 50 grams. The rest are carbs. So I weight around 180 lbs, my protein is around 200 grams. I think the most ...


2

I wonder about some of those "old school" ways, too. There is a spread on Arnold, showing his exercise routine and all those calories he takes in a day. Do you hit the gym HARD a couple of times a day, get lots of good daily cardio, and have a job working on the assembly line? Then 3150 calories might be what you would need to increase muscle mass. If you ...


1

I googled a bit and stumbled upon the following formula. The source claims it's from Journal of Sports Sciences. Men use the following formula: Calories Burned = [(Age x 0.2017) + (Weight x 0.09036) + (Heart Rate x 0.6309) -- 55.0969] x Time / 4.184. Women use the following formula: Calories Burned = [(Age x 0.074) -- (Weight x 0.05741) ...


1

Likely what you are asking for is the formula to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate. Here is the Harris-Benedict equation for BMR: Women: BMR = 655 + ( 9.6 x weight in kilos ) + ( 1.8 x height in cm ) - ( 4.7 x age in years ) Men: BMR = 66 + ( 13.7 x weight in kilos ) + ( 5 x height in cm ) - ( 6.8 x age in years ) Your actual caloric needs ...



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