Hot answers tagged

31

Absolutely not. Our metabolism is a complex system of organs working together that dictate how food is used, disposed of, etc. Not to mention, based on your goals and body type, different manipulations to your diet are indeed necessary. A NIH-funded study tried to suss out the associations between specific foods, lifestyle factors, and weight gain. Its ...


18

One calorie (with a lower case c) is the amount of energy required to heat 1 gram of water by 1°C. A kilocalorie is 1000 calories, and Calorie (with a capital C) and kilocalorie (Kcal) are synonyms. On food labels, nutrition facts are in terms of kilocalories/Calories. (Wikipedia) Just like with grams vs. kilograms, units are used in a way that the number ...


17

Calorie calculators calculate how many calories you need to consume to remain the same weight. If you are active it means you burn more calories during the day, thus you need to consume more calories to remain the same weight. If you'd like to lose weight you should eat less calories then what is recommended (not substantially though). The key point here ...


15

To get a fairly exact calculation follow these steps: Step 1: Calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). This is the number of calories that's needed to keep your body functioning without you doing any activity at all. It doesn't take muscle mass into consideration so it will underestimate the calories needs for very muscular people and overestimate them ...


15

In a sense, yes it does. It's not a permanent increase, you simply keep on burning more calories than your resting rate until your body returns to baseline. The type of exercise (the shorter, higher intensity workouts are better) also influences how long this occurs. In this study : http://www.mendeley.com/research/postexercise-energy-expenditure-response-...


12

This is absolutely a good approach. You get to build up some muscle, and you don't damage your metabolism the way you would with severe calorie restriction. I think it is worth doing a little myth-busting. A pound of muscle will burn more calories per day, but only about 6 more calories and you'll likely eat a little more to compensate. However, the ...


12

Short answer It is NOT necessary to eat less carbs to lose weight. Scientific answer Weight loss occurs when you burn more calories than you take in. The body can take calories from the following food sources: Fat: 1 gram = 9 calories Protein: 1 gram = 4 calories Carbohydrates: 1 gram = 4 calories Alcohol: 1 gram = 7 calories It can also break down ...


12

Trying to sweat more during a workout is an idea that's left over from sports with weight categories, like rowing, boxing, collegiate wrestling. The idea is that an athlete will put on extra muscle weight, then dehydrate him or herself right before an event or weigh-in to fit into a desired weight category. Most of the sports will allow the athlete some ...


11

According to this article on Livestrong, your brain burns ~20% of your body's energy (pretty impressive, considering it only accounts for 2% of your body weight). Here's a more acedemic source to support this (Thanks matt!). However, according to Livestrong, this is not really due to thinking: Most of your brain's energy use is dedicated to operating ...


11

There's a video on YouTube called "Sugar: The Bitter Truth", a lecture by Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, that (from my understanding) implies that, at least in the context of taking in copious amounts of unhealthy sugars such as sucrose, fructose, and high fructose corn syrup, you can offset the bad ...


11

This is a complex question, and no one has the complete answer, but a recent study compared the metabolic rate of a hunter gatherer culture still in existence with the metabolism of sedentary westerners and found that "daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners". Similarly, a study found that the ...


10

While drawing diagrams to calculate it would be fun, have you considered comparing your heart rate with and without the stroller? That would be a much more reliable than trying to estimate the increased energy requirements. Here's why: We would need to calculate the friction the stroller has with the ground, which depends both on its weight (with or ...


10

The first thing that separates extreme athletes from most of the rest of us is the amount of energy they require. It's true that when you need to consume 12,000 Calories to keep up with your training, you simply can't eat clean. It's easy to make up all the protein the body needs within that amount of Calories, so these athletes can eat pretty much ...


9

If you are "actually" overweight, meaning that your body considers itself to have excess fat, then you can restrict calories significantly as long as you maintain a healthy lifestyle of exercise and can do so without becoming exhausted or excessively hungry. Some people can reduce intake into the low hundreds (300-500) or even stop eating completely for a ...


9

In an effort to support the very thorough answer given by @Berin Loritsch, here is a more explicit conceptual picture. The mass food that is taken into the body (A) has 3 potential fates: 1) it will not be digested or absorbed by the digestive system (gut) and will pass out of the body via the anus. There are many factors that affect this but mainly it is ...


9

Unfortunately, it's not always simple arithmetic. Yes, losing weight is essentially burning more calories than you consume. But, this simplistic view doesn't account for the complex happenings of food digestion and body activity associated with eating unhealthy food. A prime example is diet soda. Diet soda has 0 calories, so theoretically, you could ...


9

Yes, and there's more to consider than just muscle mass. About 70% of a human's total energy expenditure is due to the basal life processes within the organs of the body (see table). About 20% of one's energy expenditure comes from physical activity and another 10% from thermogenesis, or digestion of food (postprandial thermogenesis).[6] All of these ...


9

Yes it is, this is the Formula when you dont know the VO2max (Maximal oxygen consumption) Male: ((-55.0969 + (0.6309 x HR) + (0.1988 x W) + (0.2017 x A))/4.184) x 60 x T Female: ((-20.4022 + (0.4472 x HR) - (0.1263 x W) + (0.074 x A))/4.184) x 60 x T HR = Heart rate (in beats/minute) W = Weight (in kilograms) A = Age (in years) T = Exercise ...


8

According to this paper, about 4.1 kcal per hour above what you would have burned sitting in an office chair. .... Sitting on a therapy ball or standing may be a passive means of increasing energy expenditure throughout the workday. The purpose of this study was to determine the energy expenditure and liking of performing clerical work in ...


8

That really depends on what your goals are. If you're trying to lose weight, then a calorie deficit is a good thing. But if you're trying to put on muscle, you actually want to be gaining weight (albeit muscle mass), so you want to be consuming more calories than you burn. You said you're trying to lose weight, so I'll elaborate a little more. From what I'...


7

The estimated BMR for a male of your height/weight/age is 2000 calories/day. This is how many calories you'd burn if you stayed in bed all day long. Your daily activities, including going to work, doing chores, taking care of kids, reading, etc, will burn a few hundred calories on top of that, more if your job isn't sedentary. Finally, any exercise you do - ...


7

Keep in mind that appetite matters, especially when trying to lose weight. In my experience, carb heavy foods are very bad at appetite suppression. Case in point the "hungry an hour later" effect of Chinese food. That is one of the chief reasons that low carb diets work. I could easily eat 800 calories of bread and still be a a little hungry. 800 calories of ...


7

You should get yourself a decent heart-rate monitor and calibrate it yourself (as good as possible). What you do is you take a cycling home trainer and you follow the following protocol: Maintain 80 rpm all the time Start cycling for 3-5 minutes at 100 Watt Add 30 Watt every 3 minutes Monitor your heart rate Assuming everything is more or less accurate, ...


7

So there are a few problems with blindly cutting calories. The first is you don't quite understand what your body needs, and how to address the problems causing you to be overweight. A common ailment in western food is the over-abundance of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats. So what problems does that cause? The pancreas gets overworked producing insulin. ...


7

I would be skeptical as well. Although there may be an increased metabolic load to cool the body, it seems to me that the readings are more likely to be related to measurement error of the Bodybugg. According to the company, the Bodybugg contains four sensors: Accelerometer Heat Flux (amount of heat being dissipated by the body) Galvanic Skin Response (...


7

To answer that question it would require a long discussion about the pancreas, the colon, the kidneys, the liver and general digestion. I believe the thyroid also has a role to play. The one organ that is most involved with regulating the fat stores is the pancreas. When your body has a surplus of blood sugar, it secretes insulin which stores the excess ...


7

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight exerts ...


7

If this was a one-off, perhaps you don't need to do worry about it. However, if situations like these repeat themselves, it might be a good idea to simply observe, for a time, your eating habits and think about what might trigger these hunger attacks. (What follows are two observations of my own. They might or might not fit your sitation; please judge for ...


6

For a decent estimate, figure out the total number of minutes you spent walking and the total amount you spent running, and multiply each by the appropriate number of Calories/minute (Here is a site with some speed vs. energy expenditure charts). If you don't know how fast you run/walk find a measured track (they're usually 200 or 400m) and time yourself. ...


6

It does burn 'differently' in that your heart rate is one of the best ways to figure out precisely what is being burned when you burn a calorie. This page has a good basic explanation about the fat-burning basics, while this page has more details about each cardio zone. Basically, if you are doing moderate intensity workouts, you are burning the maximum ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible