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Basics: Yes, you do have to burn more calories than you eat to lose weight. This doesn't mean you'll have to do sports until you burn up 1200kcal, as your body burns a certain amount every day anyway. The calories burned this way is your basal metabolic rate (BMR). This would be your total energy expenditure for one day if you just lay around doing ...


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Carlories are "energy", yes. They do NOT equate to strength; strength is a function of how well the muscles are converting that energy into force. Stored calories do affect stamina, if you have trained your body to access the stored energy (eg, if you've learned to ignore the discomfort that comes from starting to relatively rapidly metabolize fat). Of ...


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It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight ...


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Calories in/calories out relates very well to the first law of thermodynamics. You consume calories, but they're never created or destroyed, they can only change forms. If you don't use that energy when its available, it gets stored as fat. At other times, it converts into the heat that each of our bodies give off. Think TDEE, or total daily energy ...


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A= m*a*s; mass*acceleration*s-distance. or A=F*s Force; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_(physics) I do not think it is very easy to calculate force though. when i do the math i usually estimate force as gravity force and acceleration as Gravitational acceleration. Why it is not very important is : energy expenditure during the lift is not ...


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I think the body will burn more calories (or at least, the same amount) during exhaustion. This is because the body is actually doing more work (thus, expending more energy) while in this state. Although the body might not be moving as fast as it was or as intense, the whole body is firing on all its cinders, the heart is desperately working to keep up ...


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I googled a bit and stumbled upon the following formula. The source claims it's from Journal of Sports Sciences. Men use the following formula: Calories Burned = [(Age x 0.2017) + (Weight x 0.09036) + (Heart Rate x 0.6309) -- 55.0969] x Time / 4.184. Women use the following formula: Calories Burned = [(Age x 0.074) -- (Weight x 0.05741) ...



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