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16

Starting Strength Because it's the best introduction to the most productive yet neglected aspect of fitness: strength. Bring up weights to most people, and they think of machines and curls and bodybuilding. Starting Strength lays out a cogent alternative, closer to many people's goals. Many people still think of "fitness" as synonymous with "cardio" or ...


10

It seems like you're asking two questions. Why strength? And why these exercises? These are both answered in "Strength & Barbells: The Foundations of Fitness" (http://startingstrength.com/articles/strength_fitness_wolf.pdf) Why strength? Since 1.) strength significantly improves nine of the ten aspects of fitness, and 2.) the tenth can be ...


10

I want to mention that I am in no way opposed to Starting Strength. As Dave mentioned, it has a lot of useful tips for beginners. In that it stresses form and core movements it should be commended. However it is highly regarded because there is a press and advertising behind it. They are smart even down to the name... Starting Strength. Meaning no ...


9

At the novice stages, all activities can improve general fitness. As one progresses, however, all attributes improve in more activity-specific ways. This is less true of attributes like strength and more true of attributes like cardio. We have a general cardiovascular capability, which can be measured by activities we are not accustomed to or by VO2MAX. But ...


9

Not sure why this is getting downvoted, but there is no surefire, fast, "urgent" way to get healthy. There are no shortcuts to becoming healthy or fit. Thinking otherwise is dangerous. This is also a very difficult question to answer, because it's vague. But the bottom line is, eat healthy, and become more active. Learn more about healthy nutrition from ...


8

You want to look muscled without being big. The good news is, it's hard to get too many muscles. The solution is to lift a little and get your body fat down. "Toned" The word "toned" means different things to different people. It's not a technical term, like "strong" or "powerful" or even "big". Most people use "toned" to communicate their desire to look ...


8

Most people have misconceptions what 'tone', what it is, and how to achieve it. Being toned is a combination of two things - having muscle mass, and having a low enough amount of body fat to show the definition between the aforementioned muscles. A six pack is simply satisfying these conditions in a specific area - the stomach. Lifting If you're 6'1 152, ...


7

The body uses two different energy systems to fuel the body’s activity or exercise. Anaerobic - First the body uses the anaerobic system which has energy ready to go as soon as you start to use your muscles. Anaerobic means without oxygen. Aerobic - The second energy system, the aerobic system, kicks in when your short term, initial energy from the ...


7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


6

In order to get big, you need to eat a calorie surplus (more than you burn in a day). To get cut, you need to eat a caloric deficit. If you eat 200g+ protein but still eat fewer calories than you're burning, you're going to lose weight and you won't get huge and bulky. If you're trying to get cut, I'm assuming that you're trying to lose weight and/or lower ...


5

Both my wife and my daughter have exercise induced asthma, and what you are describing sounds like what they deal with. Go to a doctor to determine exactly what the problem you are experiencing truly is. If it does happen to be exercise induced asthma, the doctor will give you an inhaler so that you can use it when your chest begins to tighten up. That ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


3

Your question is in some ways quite broad, but in the narrow sense: yes, long distance slow paced steady-state cardio like marathon running absolutely reduces muscle mass, and has a distinctly diminished return on investment after you've been doing it for a while. That is, if you work yourself up to running X miles every week, staying at X miles each week ...


3

Well, I'll answer from my perspective of noob/novice to serious gym training. The reason I love the book is that explains everything you need to know about the most serious exercises a poor unconditioned bastard like me has to do it, and HOW to do it. The challenge I encounter is finding a spotter who understands the "middle of the foot" concept and the ...


3

This, this right here is your problem: I am bit of an foodie, so I occasionally overeat. As cliche as it is, what goes in your mouth is more important than what exercise you do. If you want to lose weight, you need to track what you eat. You can't out run a bad diet It takes about: - a minute to eat an apple or a cookie - 5 minutes of jump rope to ...


3

For your general question, according to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, you need: 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) every week and weight training muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, ...


3

Assuming that your test is in the fairly near future, you aren't going to be able to do much for your body fat percentage (i.e. the skin-fold test) or your general strength and conditioning. However, the body responds to very specific training. By far the best bang-for-the buck would be to simply practice stages 2-5 as closely to the testing conditions as ...


3

Essentially you worked off a little less than a Snickers bar. If the goal is to burn calories, you need to pick up the pace. Even a light jog will burn more Calories than an incline walk. If you aren't accustomed to the higher intensity cardio work, your body will adapt pretty quickly--particularly if you employ intervals to do it. That said, higher ...


3

It's easy to blame genetics, when the truth of the matter is the work you were doing wasn't the right kind of work for your goals. The truth is nothing comes easy to everyone. While genetics are a factor, the biggest limiting factors really don't have much to do with that. SAID Principle Exercise is subject to the SAID principle, or Specific Adaptations ...


3

I can relate to your story here. I'm a former smoker, and I have completely quit smoking now. Stamina is one thing, speed is another. Before you try to hit speed, try to improve your stamina. I used to struggle to do 1K, but now I do 5K (which roughly 3.1 miles) in under 30 minutes. It's something which comes with practice. I would say start practicing ...


3

Per a 5/3/1 article by Jim Wendler on T-Nation, you're supposed to have supplemental cardio two or three times a week: The Triumvirate uses three exercises per workout, one of which is a core lift. Before each workout, do a warm-up that includes mobility, flexibility, something to raise your core temperature and heart rate (like rope jumping), and foam ...


3

Basics: Yes, you do have to burn more calories than you eat to lose weight. This doesn't mean you'll have to do sports until you burn up 1200kcal, as your body burns a certain amount every day anyway. The calories burned this way is your basal metabolic rate (BMR). This would be your total energy expenditure for one day if you just lay around doing ...


2

For someone starting out 5-7 mins is just way too long to be sitting around in between sets. You need to be doing something not reading! If you are lifting for pure strength - not size or tone or athletic reasons - than longer break times can work. But not at 5-7 mins per. That means you spent 21 mins doing 15 squats? That doesn't seem efficient. There ...


2

I think your friend is over-thinking it. According to this study, there are several factors that contribute to continued burning of calories after exercise, one of which is: Decrease in Body Temperature: As energy is liberated from the exercising muscle tissues of the body, heat is produced. Thus, during EPOC, the body must expend energy to return ...


2

Prevents you from burning calories? I certainly haven't heard anything like that. I suppose their theory is that if your core temperature remains higher, your heart rate will also remain higher? Or are they saying that by taking a cold shower your body has to work harder to regain that body temp? Either way, I have a hard time believing that the temperature ...


2

As JohnP mentioned in a comment, what you need is interval training. The simplest is all-out interals, which, if you haven't done them before, are fairly The first is pure interval training. Basically, you warm up for 10-15 minutes, and then do a series of all out efforts. Typically, something like 2 minutes as hard as you can go, rest for 5-10 minutes, ...


2

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of ...


2

The reason for the difference in these two results is that the second formula that you cite is not a direct heart rate zone, but it rather is an assessment of heart rate reserve (HRR) (Karvonen formula). HRR is the difference between your maximum heart rate (MHR) (Either predicted or measured) and your resting heart rate. The theory is that as you get ...



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