Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

As long as you are in a caloric deficit, you will lose weight no matter what your current body fat % is. How much of that weight is fat and how much muscle will depend on your training, caloric deficit and current body fat %. Cardio is absolutely not needed to lose fat or reach a very low body fat %. It simply makes it easier, since most people enjoy eating ...


2

Your body needs to maintain temperature, when you walk in the sunlight, you have two factors warming you up, you also have two things cooling you, the contact with the relatively cold air, and the evaporative cooling from sweating. When the temperature rises, the first cold factor becomes weaker, if the air is humid, the second factor will also be weaker ...


2

There are more explanations than this one, but one is what type of muscle fibre you strengthen. Muscle fibre type 1 are slow, weak but have high stamina, type 2 have low stamina but are stronger and faster. This is why some people are born to be sprinters while some are born to run long distances. If you do many reps, your type 2 fibres will tire and the ...


3

I want to have a six pack but I absolutely hate cardio. There’s a lot more that goes into achieving “six pack” abs than just doing cardio. Genetics, diet, and training consistency play a big role. If you do not have the genetic propensity for a six pack, you can certainly improve on what you do have by mixing cardio with strength training. First, ...


1

I'm not a nutricionist so I can't answer with security question 1. Question 2, however, is a little easier for my knowledge. In theory, in hot weather you consume less calories because your body doesn't need to keep warm so hard. You know, temperature is an expression of heat, Energy = mass * (calorific constant of your body) * (temperature increase) or ...


0

Yes, losing fat is about taking in fewer calories than you burn while giving your body signals about keeping muscle (lifting weights) and maintaining protein intake.


0

No one mentioned this, but bull sharks have been spotted in Lake Michigan before... http://wgntv.com/2014/08/14/is-that-a-shark-in-lake-michigan/


-1

It is very normal to sweat during a weight lifting training and even necessary for the body to cool off during the workout. When you workout your body need extra energy to do the training, it burns more fuel, it creates more heat and thus needs to cool itself = sweating. You usually sweat more in cardio because you burn more, but also in weight lifting. ...


4

If I ride my bike to the gym, which is a mile from my house, and back home, should I do cardio at my gym. A 1 mile bike ride really doesn't qualify as a "cardio workout". I am also lifting weights 4 times a week ... and I run for 15 minutes after my ... weight training I really don't think this is enough workout that you need to worry about ...


1

To expand on the first answer, it depends. Cardio has two main uses: 1) It increases the amount of work you can do in a given workout session. As you get further into a workout, the aerobic system provides more and more of the energy used to lift the weights. Stronger aerobic system = more reps/sets completed. 2) It increases the calories your body needs ...


-3

The answer is simple: 1) If your goal is to lose weight - yes, do cardio! 2) If your priority is to put on mass and muscle, dont do it. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.


1

Yes, it is normal to sweat while lifting weight, especially if you do compound lifts like squats and deadlifts, it also depends heavily on the temperature in the room. I sweat a lot more in the summer. The reason why you sweat is to maintain your body temperature at around 37 degrees, when you use energy in any way, you will be pushing your temperature ...


1

Why not tie a rope or something to the boat and yourself? So if anything happens to the boat you'll still be connected.


1

Is it safe? It's somewhat less safe than swimming alone in a backyard pool without a life jacket. It's all about your own personal assumption of risk. You are an experienced swimmer and (presumably) experienced boater. You are swimming with a life jacket on. You have taken steps to minimize what factors you can. There are myriad things that could go wrong, ...


3

Having crossed the Pacific Ocean on our own boat, we thought a lot about questions such as this. In general I would not be concerned about swimming mid-lake, as the danger does not seem materially greater than the boat sinking mid-lake with you aboard, a risk you seem willing to accept. Obviously significant swell or wind which could blow the boat away from ...


0

A suggestion, since you seem to prefer the quiet aspect of this, would be to find someone that enjoys floating on a boat out in the middle of nowhere with a good book or music. They can relax on the boat and read while you swim alone. Maybe have a beer and sandwiches together. They also get a boat to hang out on, assuming they don't have one, and you get an ...


6

It depends what you mean by okay. If you mean "is it safe?" then the answer is simple: No, it is not safe. If you get into trouble you stand a high risk of death. No-one will be able to rescue you. But for the broader question of whether that means it's not okay, we can't answer that. It's up to you to assess the danger by assessing the chances of an ...


11

I've done a lot of offshore sailing and sometimes you'll get totally becalmed. Hot muggy conditions and the water is so flat you can literally shave in the reflection. It's hard not to jump in with conditions like that. Soap up, jump in, swim around the boat a few times, etc. A very famous and accomplished sailor named Bernard Moitessier would (solo) have ...


23

Although swimming alone in the middle of Lake Michigan sounds wonderful and has its benefits to you, swimming alone has life altering/ending risks. The chances may be minimal that something dangerous could happen, but see my story below for an example that bad things can happen. If something did happen you don't seem to have left yourself any communication ...


3

Will eating lots of eggs and peanut butter, and drinking a lot of milk help you bulk up? Yes, however I hope that you are not just eating these for your breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you seriously want to gain muscle mass, then consider calculating your TDEE and add 200~500 calories(this is known caloric surplus). Next your protein intake should be 1g ...


-1

When you say "workout" I'm assuming lifting weights because you were talking about your muscles. Although lifting does help your metabolism, it doesn't really help you lose weight if you don't add cardio workouts to your workout routine. As in some of the previous comments, you can't really reduce access fat in specific areas of the body. Rather you lose % ...


1

You should use a real strength training program with proven results. You probably aren't eating enough calories, and probably not enough protein. Your body needs to recover. Especially if you get on a better program, your caloric needs will go up a lot. I would advise staying away from body building routines in general: they're a terrific way to get ...


1

Your leg muscles will adapt to the workload placed on them, so it's not really possible to definitively say whether or not your legs will get bigger. If the effort you are putting out is more than you did squatting, then yes, your legs will grow. If it is the same, then your legs will stay about the same size, and if the bike effort is less, they will ...


-1

According to Wikipedia, The main muscles at work in cycling are the quadriceps and hamstrings in the upper leg, and the gastrocnemius and soleus in the calf. These muscles contract in a sequence that creates the pedaling action. The quadriceps and hamstrings do most of the work when you ride a bicycle. Assuming you do not know too much about how ...


2

While it's an interesting question, it would be a very short lived time anyway. VO2 max is the maximum oxygen your body can use at a given (usually fairly intense) activity level. If you exceed this work level, then you are working anaerobically, and the energy pathways for that are short lived at best. Up to VO2 max, your normal readings should be in the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included