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The simple answer is that it is safe. Whether it is effective depends upon your goals. If you are starting from an untrained condition, then it pretty much doesn't matter what you do, and working out every day will work fine. Once you get somewhat trained, things change. If you are not well-recovered, you simply cannot work hard enough to stress your ...


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Coughing up blood is not normal. I suggest you talk to a doctor about this.


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Well, yes. DOMS isn't only experienced after focusing on exercise, but whenever your muscles have been subjected to strenuous work which it's not accustomed to. It's very possible that cardio is the culprit, but for someone who doesn't exercise at all, even taking a flight of stairs could cause DOMS. It's sometimes hard to pinpoint the exact reason, given ...


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The short Answer: It is safe to do cardio daily. The use of "intense" really depends on your body. If you build up your routine by starting with 20 minutes of running daily and then the week after 30, 40, etc. eventually getting to an "intense" cardio workout, then it is fine. Throwing yourself into an intense routine every day without the build up may ...


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Cardio can be good, but I'd recommend doing weights a few times a week aswell since you have a desk job and are inactive for most of the day. Putting on more muscle will mean you're burning more calories throughout the day while at rest. Weight training is also more fun than cardio on a machine in my opinion :) Good luck!


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I would say don't worry about it as your cardio machine is probably innacurate anyway. Yes as you lose weight your metabolic needs go down, but all you have to do is readjust your calorie intake and keep going. FYI For more accurate calorie tracker is this from Journal of Sports Science http://www.braydenwm.com/cal_vs_hr_ref_paper.pdf Calories Burned = ...


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Calisthenics (body weight exercises), my friend, is one of your best options. Most calisthenic exercises do not require a lot of equipment and are very effective as they're combinations of cardio and strength training. Not only can you perform them at home, you can even perform some of them at work, right by your desk. Of course, the most famous ...


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You could try doing some circuit training while out on your walks. Things like push ups, sit ups, box jumps(if you find a rock/bench or something to jump on), there's so many things you could add in. Could maybe also try some HIIT(bit different to jogging as it's done in short intense bursts). Also could give yoga a shot. This can be done pretty much ...


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Honestly, if you can do 30 minutes of cardio every morning, that's perfectly fine, so long as you realize that your diet has to be aligned with your goals as well. It seems like you have that covered though. Obviously, there is no way we can tell you that instead of 30 minutes, you should be doing 28 or 41 minutes, because we're all different, and even ...


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With weight training, find a program (I do 5/3/1) and follow it exactly. In other words, you find a program (there are many, many programs), be honest about your lifting numbers, and progress just as it says from there. With cardio, no more than an hour really makes sense - you have to live a little, and pumping away on a treadmill for more than an hour ...


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If you are doing it on high elevation(which you probably are if it is incline) or for long amounts of time then that should pay up for it.


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As the study that Greg cites shows, there is no real difference in the window for protein intake. People may be confusing this with the studies that show supercompensation of glycogen storage when carbohydrates are consumed in the period ("the golden hour") after prolonged aerobic exercise. However, you may want to reconsider doing cardio immediately ...


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2010 ISSN Position Stand: • Individuals engaged in a general fitness program can typically meet needs by consuming a normal diet (45-55% CHO; 3-5 g/kg/day). • Athletes involved in moderate amounts of intense training (2-3 hrs/day, 5-6 times/week) typically need to consume 55-65% CHO (5-8 g/kg/day or 250 - 1,200 g/day for 50 - 150 kg athletes) in order to ...


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It won't. As long as you meet your daily requirements you will be fine, regardless how many minutes after your workout you will have a shake.


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Creatine isn't going to hurt you. And I can see it providing some good benefits for you, because what you're describing seems a lot like HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). The way creatine could help you here, is by providing better endurance through increased muscle recovery during sets/intervals. Also, creatine strengthens muscular contraction, ...


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I'll add a slightly different take on the other answer: Yes, you can do 2 or 3 hours of cardio in a day. But you should build up to it. You'll find that many cyclists and runners will do a longer workout or two on the weekend, but maybe just an hour on weeknights at a more brisk pace. A rest day isn't a bad idea either. The important thing that you've ...


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I don't think you'll be able to survive for very long doing 3 hours of running (as an example) eating 1500 calories a day. 2,000 - 3,000 calories per day of deficit (depending on your needs) is really hard. I'm assuming this is for weight loss, and I think you'll have much better results following the tried and true mechanisms for fat loss and body ...


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Always check with your doctor before attempting a new exercise program, especially if as in your case you have a problem. Although you have "flat feet" you may also have other problems that cause pain and swelling of your lower legs with walking or running. Your doctor will give you a diagnosis and may suggest a podiatrist (foot doctor) or physical therapy ...


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It is both very accurate, and very inaccurate. When you gain fat, you gain fat in all the fat repositories. On the same coin, when you lose fat, you lose it in all the same places at once. Important: You can't pick and choose where to gain/lose fat. The reason why it seems like you gain it in certain areas more than others (like belly and butt), is ...


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YEP! ...but only in excess. Cardio used as warm-up exercises should not be detrimental to gains. But prolonged sessions of cardio will reduce size.


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Yes Strictly speaking, anything other than walking, light stretching, resting, lifting heavy weights, and eating is cutting into your strength and muscle gains. Those attributes are built with specific stimulus and recovery. Cardio is not part of that specific stimulus or recovery and therefore is an interloper. But that's only the case if your single goal ...


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Cycling is a wonderful cardiovascular exercise and it limits bouncing and impact (assuming you're on smooth paved roads or groomed trails mostly) which helps with some larger breast issues AND is gentler on your limbs than running. Running is nicely complimented by cycling and you may see that you have less pain in joints if you supplement your cardio ...



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