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1

Your cardiovascular fitness and genetics are likely to play a larger role on your heart rate than your body fat% Normally I would recommend long durations of lower intensity exercise in order to build cardiovascular exercise (long slow runs, etc) however you say "I feel I am quite adapted to this routine". Can you tell us what your resting heart rate it? ...


1

You should consider getting into a sport that involves other people as well. Running is great, but unless you have a running budy, it's yet another lonely activity where you need to rely on your own discipline. Everyone can get started, do a few runs and feel good. The hardest part of running as an exercise is the discipline involved with doing it regularly ...


-1

I'm kind of the in same boat as you and I would reccomend buying a single speed bike to get your fitness up and then start running.


1

Honestly, you won't lose your muscles in 15 days, that is too short. I know that hiking can be tyring sometimes (I live near the alps and hike often), but that is not enough to really lose muscles. Last year I spent one month in South America, at high altitudes (+3500m), most of the time hiking, I did not lose any muscles (but I burned fat, that was cool!). ...


2

Basically, unless you know more or less exactly how many calories you're gonna burn daily, you will lose some muscle. Obviously, if you have a good estimate of how much you will burn, try to eat over this amount + your bodyweight in lbs x 15 (which is the amount of calories required for bodyweight maintenance for an average male) in calories. I will discuss, ...


-1

You can refer to the following video for demonstration of THE BIG 5 WORKOUT for home. I don't know if the exercises can improve the aerobic level.


1

Possibly with some bodyweight exercises, though I'd recommend against it. Having a quick look into the "Big 5 Workout", it seems like a standard HIT program, so performing one set to absolute failure. The key word there is "absolute". If you're performing an exercise to muscular failure, then your form goes all to hell. If you're performing an upper body ...


2

No. Although there may be some improvement, HIT isn't designed to improve upon cardiovascular fitness in any way, shape or form. HIT (High Intensity Training), as popularised by Arthur Jones in the 1970's, is designed to improve strength and muscular hypertrophy by performing weighted exercises, usually on machines (such as the Nautilus ones created by ...


2

Yes. Sparring IS HIIT training, of course depending on the intensity you go. But it's pretty well known that more and more martial artists are doing HIIT training to prepare themselves for more and more rounds. Personally, as an amateur boxer, I get do HIIT training once a week by running sprints. 2km warmup, then 10 x 100m sprints. Then 2km run back home. ...


4

The Big 5 workout consists of these exercises (or rather categories thereof). Upper body pull. This is a horizontal pull. Getting some dumbbells that can be plate-loaded would allow you to do dumbbell rows, but for good strength development you'd end up with weights that aren't very practical for dumbbells, and a seated row or barbell rows would be better. ...


2

I have never smoked but know runners that do or used to. Running may not make you quit smoking immediately but as you increase your mileage you will want to more and more. I know a lot of smokers who run short distances but very few who run long distances regularly. Don't worry about your caffeine addiction, many runners have one and there is no consensus ...


8

Your question is pretty subjective, because nobody can tell you how much to run, or whether or not you'll even enjoy it as a regular activity. Same with diet and time of day, that's all personal and you'll have to determine it for yourself. The first item that I would stress (Other than your already recognized need to quit smoking), is that given your ...


2

Exactly. You say "not including" diet, so if you're unwilling to sacrifice calories from food then you will have to increase calories burned through exercise, and keep calorie intake the same.



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