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1

Listing exercises and how many sets or series will depend on your body structure and your experience, but there are some assumptions. If you are talking about build more muscle mass in your chest region, in a "bulking" context, you should priorize compound exercises which have chest region as one of its important targets, but these exercises, for example, ...


0

Some people have better genetics for creating a beautiful chest, some people will always have ugly chests. All we can do is make the most of what we're dealt. Start out by working out your whole chest, increase muscle mass in pecs, delts as well as traps and lats, having nice abs will help as well. Also lower your body fat level to the level you prefer. ...


0

The primary function of the pectorals is to adduct the upper arm (Bring in closer to the body), which in function means that an arm pointing out to the side will come in closer to the body or end up pointing forward instead of to the side. If you do your dips leaning forward, so that the upper arm moves away from the body, then when you contract and come ...


4

It's not really a case of dips hitting chest instead of triceps. Dips hits both. But depending on how you do it, it will be working one more than the other. If you want to engage triceps more, try not going down beyond a 90 degree elbow bend, and make sure you lock your arms out completely on every rep. It's the upper part of the lift that engages triceps ...


1

I think there's many reasons: Some likely do leg work but perhaps run a split routine and leg day is a day you're not in the gym. Some may do a leg intensive sport and working the upper body in the gym is a way to compensate On the other hand some may do an upper body intensive sport and so legs just aren't a goal for them Finally there will be some ...


2

Many reasons, primarily because leg muscles aren't as visible and often not considered as important aestetically. This is the same reason people don't workout their back enough. Of course, in the long run, doing arms and chest will make you look silly and it will be obvious that you aren't really strong. Some people also think that because they ride their ...


0

What I would tell you is that for upper body, chest, shoulders, and triceps usually work together(bench press, dips, push ups, shoulder press, chest press, tricep dumbbell bench press(see bodybuilding.com)...) well back and biceps usually also work together(pull ups, lat pull downs, curls, rows, chin ups, iso row, etc.) Legs and abs are a different category, ...


-1

I'm not very sure it's good cause you don't get the most out of it. If you can train at a better rate when doing triceps and chest separately why not? And bench-press does make the triceps work as you push the weight up.


0

The general principle is that if you are looking to maximize your muscle mass, you work the larger muscles more than the smaller ones (i.e. more fatigue inducing reps). That means you would work your triceps more than your biceps, your quads and glutes more than your hamstrings, etc. You would also work your back and your general core more than everything ...


0

There is no reason to train them more often, because as MÃ¥rten says, the fact that your legs are bigger, ensures that you use more weight, thus training them more. How often you train them depends entirely on your goals. For instance, a general worker-outer like me will do a split, and just rotate the days. But if you take a person who is actively looking ...


0

Well, they already are. If you compare leg press with bench press, you'll probably leg press about 3 times as much weight as you bench. So the proportionality to muscle size is already there. Adding more reps or sets to your legs would be out of proportion.



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