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5

Chinups (palms towards you) do activate your biceps more, but not at the cost of your lats. There's a bit of bro-science about pullups/chinups, but if you read a 2010 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research it tells a different tale. Basically, the recruitment of the latissimus dorsi is the same: A general pattern of sequential ...


4

You're not really greasing the groove right now, and greasing the groove may not be the path to your goal. Six sets of 3-4 pull-ups between squat sets is not greasing the groove--three days a week, you're not greasing the groove! 35 to 40 reps per day is not high volume Maxing out once a week is just not very much practice You're splitting your attention ...


3

Years ago, I had a similar experience that actually led to trigger finger. I have only anecdotal evidence, but, I am convinced that doing chin ups was, in some way, related to the cause of my problem. Once my problem was resolved, I still wanted to perform chin ups, so, I invested in a good pair of padded weight lifting gloves, and, more importantly, a set ...


3

How have you done the chin-ups? Take care that you keep tension all the way during the repetition especially at the bottom of the exercise. Also if you go to wide you can injure your rotator cuff. Here is some good advice on chin/pull-ups: http://jasonferruggia.com/the-shocking-truth-about-chin-ups/ it simply says that the best way to do those exercises ...


3

on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


2

Technically speaking, that's two questions and you should split them apart, but they're also likely pretty easy to answer. Chin-ups and Pull-ups use the same muscles, but at different intensities. Personally, I have similar results. I can do about six chin-ups, but only one or two pull-ups. Other people have had the opposite pattern. It depends on which ...


2

Actually, gymless training has been a trend for a few years. There is a growing amount of information available in books, DVDs, and the internet about this kind of training, under the names of "bodyweight exercises" or calisthenics. A few places to start (without spending money) would be names like: - Paul Wade (Convict Conditioning) - Al Kavadlo (Pushing ...


1

In answer to your title question, no. They both involve all of the muscles listed above. A chin-up focuses a bit more on the biceps whilst pull-ups distribute more effort across the back. Changing the width of your grip will focus on different parts of your back. But in the end, your body is doing the same amount of work over all of those muscles you listed. ...


1

Is this satisfactory enough to build muscles up? Provided you are in a caloric surplus(eating more than your TDEE, by adding 100~500 cal to your TDEE), then yes. Also since you are running, make sure you are able to consume the calories you lose from running. Consider doing your workout with 3~4 sets(up to you to make the changes here) for every 3~15 reps. ...



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