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10

I would say it is almost impossible to exactly mantain body size. I would recommend to alternate low workout periods with higher ones (say, 1 month of aerobic and low intensity and low volume weight training and 1 month of higher weight training). In this way, you would lose a bit of muscle while reducing body fat and re-taking previous muscular condition at ...


9

Congratulations on opting for a healthy lifestyle. It is way too easy to get into the trap of a sedentary lifestyle. The younger you start getting back in shape, the easier it is with more lifetime benefits. If you have any medical problems check with your doctor first. (Standard disclaimer, but worthwhile. Even at your age you may have signs of a ...


8

I have heard of the One Lift a Day method, described here by bodyweight/movement/gymnastics expert Ido Portal: after their technical judo workout, the coach will name one exercise and one exercise only, and the trainees will go on to perform 7-12 sets of this exercise. One day it will be squat (5 rep range is optimal here), the next pull ups hanging from ...


4

There are a large number of different catabolic pathways that the body uses, of which the the aerobic/anaerobic dichotomy you present is a useful characterisation. These processes are not mutually exclusive of each other, but instead occur continuously regulated by enzymes in the various tissues which themselves respond to the concentration of chemicals in ...


4

Most people who are trying to gain weight have no issue with fat. That's a good thing, because the only thing that will help you gain is to eat a lot of food. To keep the weight on, you need to turn that food into muscle, which requires the right type of work to build that muscle. In short, the quickest way to build muscle is to lift heavy things. Those ...


4

You have two main questions: Gaining weight Being able to gain (or lose) weight is a matter of intake to output - simple, right? The output (burn) consists of your activity level including how your metabolism actually works. Each person's metabolism is different and can change based on age, genetics, etc. By eating 6 times a day, you are probably ...


4

Consistently training to failure (which is what you're talking about) is a relatively controversial training technique. Some people advocate it as a way to push through plateau periods while others (myself included) consider it overtraining. I think the only really beneficial thing about training "until they broke down or had to throw up" is that it will ...


3

There is a lot of debate about this topic in the running world still. The "180 as optimum" was taken after viewing footage of elite marathoners mid race, and counting steps. There has been some confirmation that some marathoners train at that cadence as well, but there have been just as many that don't fall into that range. What I've found as a coach, is ...


3

Everyone has to start somewhere. You will very quickly find out how far you can go. Do not try and keep up with the class, but do work on keeping your legs moving as long as you can. I.e. Do the best you can, considering the circumstances. You will get better with practice, and have patience. One of the things the instructor will do is suggest tension ...


3

It doesn't focus on precisely those exercises, but you might want to check out Building the Gymnastic Body, which has exercise progressions that incorporate both the V-sit and the V-hang. The emphasis is a little different, but the exercise progressions may still get you what you need. The book isn't as detailed as what you want in terms of "X number of ...


3

Conditioning out of the pool is important and can be very beneficial for swimmers. As an competitive swimmer myself, I believe dryland conditioning should be included in any workout for a swimmer, regardless of level of ability. As @Robin identifies, compound weight lifting exercises are great for both strength and endurance. Improving strength and/or ...


3

I have no strength or stretching exercises for this purpose, but I do see this: I have been spending one afternoon a week practicing cartwheels, handstands, backbends, and walkovers. Gymnastics skills benefit from frequent practice. Even a quick few minutes of practice every day could make a huge difference versus once a week.


3

Start out like everyone else Obviously, you're not excused from working your entire body, because if you just train certain areas, you're messing up your body, so first things first, get a regular training program, and start from there. Rock climbing specific training The one area where rock climbers simply excel beyond anyone else, is the ratio between ...


2

Properly executed weight training will increase, not decrease, your flexibility and mobility. Use full-range-of-motion exercises such as dead-hang pull-ups, below-parallel barbell squats, and deadlifts. Lifting heavy and eating a lot of food will cause you to gain weight. Swimming and kickboxing will make that progress slower. How you structure your ...


2

JudoFitness asserts that the three pathways smoothly shift gears when training hard for extended periods of time: Note the significant overlap as one pathway depletes itself and the next takes its place. The author uses the example of a long stair climb, performed explosively for as long as the phosphagenic pathway can sustain, then less explosively but ...


2

A nice barbell circuit on top of a powerlifting and GPP (General Physical Preparedness) routine. Here is Randy Couture talking and demonstrating his barbell circuit: youtube randy couture barbell circuit Paraphrased from a CrossFitter's recollection of a Randy Couture seminar where they discussed his strength & conditioning routine: ...


2

Some of the reading I've done on swimming addressed swimming in endless pools or with a rope tied around your waist, and suggested even that wouldn't properly train you for swimming, so I'd think some type of dry land exercise would be even less useful. My best advice is to do compound weight lifting exercises (deadlifts, squats, overhead presses) for ...


2

I've seen guys that are still very flexable while lifting weights. The thing to do is keep doing the kickboxing and flexability type exercises along with the weightlifting. Diet, exercise and rest definately go together, but really you need to figure out how many calories your burning compared to how many your eating. I have found some good free ...


2

The awesome thing about HIIT is that it isn't just a cardio, but it is also a muscle building form of exercise. Allow me to explain. When a person runs on a treadmill for about 30 minutes at a steady pace, they are in essence getting an endurance workout because the fibers that are getting burned are the slow twitch ones responsible for endurance. When a ...


2

It is false that 30 minutes of constant work is necessary to improve conditioning. It is a myth based on steady-state cardio training only, and is only true in some cases even when training in that modality. For instance, it may take a significant amount of time (circa an hour!) for an experienced long-distance runner to start challenging their conditioning ...


2

If all you want to do is lose weight, all you really need is a weekly amphetamine binge. Your goals are the wrong way round. Concentrate on being healthy first. The weight loss will naturally occur. Weight loss generally doesn't occur in a straight line. It fluctuates. It is hard to stay focused on a goal that is all over the place. If you work on health, ...


2

Conditioning exercises attempt to increase athletic ability and capacity, but may also help reduce the likelihood of injury. Suppose you're a marathon runner, you don't just run marathons to train. You'd do shorter runs, some strength training etc and this will improve your marathon 'ability' even though your program does not include marathons. I have no ...


2

"Conditioning" in this context means "preparing" or "getting used to". Here, it's used as to describe treading water as a general physical preparedness (GPP) exercise. In many other fitness contexts, "conditioning" means "cardio conditioning" or "metabolic conditioning", which means training to resist fatigue from physical effort. There is task- or ...


2

There's no specific exercise that will deliver what you ask for, but there is plenty of research showing that 30+ mins or general aerobic exercise will deliver physical and cognitive benefits, have a read of: Neurobiological effects of physical exercise or Shorter term aerobic exercise improves brain, cognition, and cardiovascular fitness in aging. So simply ...


2

Overall, exercise generally lowers one's starting heart rate. HIIT may provide superior benefits to continuous training (although some disagree, saying that it's more useful when you're already at a lower HR). Overtraining can raise one's resting heart rate due to increased stress from your body trying to soldier on without sufficient recovery time. It ...


1

You may be interested in learning more about the Qi Gong exercises as part of a practice in Kung Fu which these Shaolin monks demonstrate in this video which you may already be familiar with as you mentioned you're already practicing martial arts. They appear to require much discipline and effort but appear to be highly effective as well, as far as ...


1

Wendler doesn't specify when conditioning should occur, just that it should occur. I don't think he thinks it matters. In fact, he calls you a "vag" if you do think it matters: From the book 5/3/1: I don’t care when or how you get this conditioning done, and I don’t care whether it happens on your off days or not. This only time this matters is ...


1

Matt Carlson's 5/3/1 variant Doing More With Less seems to be structured as Lifting, 3 days a week Calisthenics circuit Strength work Conditioning or running Running, 2-3 days a week: Calisthenics circuit Running His non-running, non-calisthenics conditioning work: the prowler or some of my conditioning circuits inspired by the CPAT (Candidate ...


1

Megasaur has the perfect answer to your question about what it means to "condition the body". My answer below is meant to be supplementary. Regarding your question on the application of treading water, I can answer that since my water polo practices in high school required treading water as an exercise in itself. Have you ever tried to tread water for 5-10 ...


1

There are studies out there, and a lot of personal history has shown me, that heavy strength training and Olympic lifting require a tremendous amount of focus and central nervous system activity. When you are squatting (properly with a bar, please) heavy the amount of willpower you need to muster is pretty insane, as is the amount of control you need to ...



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