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According to Physiology of Sports and Exercise: Every endurance exercise session should conclude with a cool-down period. Cool-down is best accomplished by slowly reducing the intensity of the endurance activity during the last several minutes of your workout. After running, for example, a slow, restful walk for several minutes helps prevent blood from ...


10

According to Physiology of Sports and Exercise: Every endurance exercise session should conclude with a cool-down period. Cool-down is best accomplished by slowly reducing the intensity of the endurance activity during the last several minutes of your workout. After running, for example, a slow, restful walk for several minutes helps prevent blood from ...


6

Well, it's not outdated to be sure. I'm an Exercise Science major at Ball State U and I hear that you should not sit down immediately after intense exercise. I'm not exactly sure of the mechanism but if I remember right, it is because of the way venous blood returns to the heart. Muscle contraction is a large mover of blood back to the heart by pushing blood ...


6

As athletes after a substantial workout ice baths (54 degrees Fahrenheit and below) is good for the body to halt the excessive blood flow which you have induced through stress training. This allows for faster recovery and allows the body to recharge the nervous system for the subsequent day; in an extremely minimal fashion though. Hot tubbing (or hot ...


5

Cold showers/icing help reduce swelling and inflammation. I view it the same way as treating acute injuries: you ice the first 24-48 hrs, then heat. OTOH, I dislike cold showers, so my view, and my actions, aren't always in alignment.


5

The general idea behind the rule of "don't sit after working out" (and I am not a medical expert - I don't know how valid this is) is that if you go from an intense workout to just sitting and not moving at all, blood will start to pool in the lower areas of your body. This will later cause muscle pain and extra stress to the body. In my mind, this at least ...


5

The two scientific reasons to cool down are to allow your heart rate to return to a normal, resting rate gradually instead of suddenly, and to provide lactic acid relief. The first is probably the most important. A sudden cessation of activity can create a lot of rapid changes in the body that place undo strain on the heart. The muscles are engorged with ...


3

I don't know about blood pooling or all that jibber-jabber. I do know that if I sit down right after sprints, barbell squats, deadlifts, kettlebell work, or judo, then my back and hamstrings will (without fail) get tight, lose flexibility, and possibly cramp up. I do not know the method, but I can vouch for the phenomenon.


2

The purpose is simply to recover faster. Pete Pfitzinger lists some cool-down benefits here: Cool-down for Quick Recovery A cool-down: Prevents blood pooling so blood can pump back to your heart Removes lactate from the muscles more quickly Reduces adrenaline faster which aids in recovery Reduces muscle stiffness for injury prevention Pete talks about ...


2

Don't take a shower after a workout until your body has cooled down, and you are not sweating anymore. (or else the shower won't 'take', and you will sweat after it.) (a shower should not be used in order to cool down. A shower should just purely be to clean yourself) Also, you should wear a long sleeve shirt after your workout if it is even remotely ...


1

There is an absolute possibility your experiencing dehydration. I would consider increasing water intake pre-workout significantly.


1

The best way would be to submerge most of your body in a tub of cold water (1-15 C or 35-59 F). However it's horribly inconvenient and if not monitored properly, dangerous. I would regulate your body temperature by drinking VERY cold water, as cold as you can stand it. Once your esophagus warms up to a comfortable temperature, have another drink. Repeat ...


1

I've also found that if I sit immediately after a session of long, intense cardio, I can experience a brief bout of low blood pressure (I.e., my vision narrows and I almost black out). I used to experience this when I was doing road cycling and / or mountain biking. If l rode really hard, then stopped and lay down in the grass, I'd feel the above symptoms ...



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