Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Dr. Stuart McGill suggests everybody should be able to hold the plank position for two minutes. Once you are comfortable with this, I vary my routine with elevated planks single leg planks stability ball planks side planks, elevated side planks planks with feet on wall planks with feet on wall raising one leg to chest alternatively (I find this very ...


13

Work on strengthening your core muscles and back. Arm strength won't help you much if your core starts tipping over. You need to push yourself up with you core and lower back and hold it there. One way to work on balance is to spread your weight by separating your legs and feet outwards (like a center split) when you hold your lower body up. It's a similar ...


12

Simply: No they're not With ab exercises you train your muscles, the body takes it's energy from every source it got, no matter where it's needed. So you can't specifically burn fat at a particular bodypart. But as you want to reduce your belly fat, why not also define some nice muscles beneath it... It's absolutely true that you cannot burn fat at a ...


8

Adopt a combination of HIIT and strength training. Don't run 8km every day, it's completely useless and simply wears out your body for no good reason. You need to get your testosterone up to build muscle and reduce fat. I don't know if you're male or female, but it doesn't matter. The only way to do that is with exercise of very high intensity. Avoid ...


7

Your core is the neck, abdominal, back and hip muscles which are used for stability. In a very real sense, your strength can be limited by your core. In fact, a large part of your power production comes from your core strength. Core training is strengthening your abdominal and back muscles to provide more stability for the rest of your work. It's a ...


7

Absolutely yes. I used to be incredibly skinny but changed my workout completely on the advice of a personal trainer. I used to work hard on biceps with zero results. I changed my workout to focus on the major and largest muscles of the body e.g. legs and chest and my arms grew in size dramatically and that is after doing zero biceps curls or anything ...


7

Kate has given you a great article to read. I agree with this article as well. As a sports PT, I can tell you that people do not realize how much your core is actually working when you do exercises like squats, deadlifts, clean and jerks, clean and presses, and etc. If your trainer is telling you that your core is weak, you should ask your trainer to ...


6

The core, is a group of muscles that include: Pelvic Floor muscles Transversus Abdomoninis Multifidus Internal and External Obliques Rectus Abdomonis Erector Spinae Longissimus Thoracis Diaphragm Long story short, engaging your core is to engage all of these muscles. Only engaging the abdominals will pull you forward. Probably a better way to think ...


5

One more plank variation you can try is to do them with one arm: get into the normal position and then raise one hand and keep it in front of you (or anywhere else, just not flailing about). The idea is to keep the same position like usual, not to shift your body weight so that your center of mass is above the arm you use. Holding your body in such a way is ...


5

Both exercises have some overlap in terms of the muscles used, particularly internal abdominal muscles (if you maintain good posture in the plank), but I would say that they are significantly different exercises and both worth practising in their own right. In fact, beyond being static positions and involving abdominal contraction they are rather dissimilar. ...


4

If you have the muscles built already, then the thing you need to do is just practice. Eventually you'll remember to call on the muscles you need and it will become second nature. There is an example known as the Johari Window which is commonly used to portray this: Clockwise from the top-right corner: You don't realize there is more to learn, and so ...


4

You are probably weak. Strength training is the solution. The best option would be to learn to lift weights. Starting Strength, a 3-times-a-week barbell program, is a good option. StrongLifts 5x5 is also commonly recommended. (See this question.) If you can't get access to a gym or barbell, you could look into bodyweight strength training instead. These ...


4

Dead bug is a dynamic lumbar (low back) stabilizing exercise, which means the main goal is to keep the spine neutral despite shifts in torque caused by the big arm and leg movements. Sending the center of mass of one leg or both away from your core may cause your pelvis to tilt forward, and extending your arms overhead may cause your rib cage to tilt back, ...


4

The core, as it is referred to, consists of the muscles of your torso, such as your pecs, lats, psoas, abs, traps, obliques, etc. When you are asked to "engage" these muscles, this means utilizing them for stability and smooth motion. Rather than just flinging yourself wildly and letting the forces of nature work on you (centrifugal force, gravity, etc), you ...


4

You should always mix up exercise types, as each different exercise targets different areas and muscles and stresses/strengthens different tendons and joints. After a period of doing the same exercise with the same resistance, you will no longer be gaining strength, but rather endurance. Increasing time will gain you additional endurance, but I doubt ...


4

In general, it is a good idea to mix up the type of exercise to give your body some new stimulus every few weeks (8-10). So, do crunches or planks on the side or other variations, you should be able to find a ton of exercises online. Oh, and try to increase your plank time to over three minutes :)


4

It really depends on what you are looking for. As xiaohouzi79 said, if you're happy with your current arm growth doing other exercises, that's perfectly fine. However, if you're looking for additional definition (not growth) you will most likely at least have to have one good time in your lifting cycle focusing on your arms. I would recommend that you make ...


4

You can try the hanging windshield wipers exercise. It targets include the obliques. Steps: start with hanging on a pullup bar raise you legs to your arms, keeping legs straight, so that you will look like a U then keeping your legs together, move them side to side like in a "wiping" motion. Instructional videos can be found on Youtube: Leg raises with ...


4

I highly agree with the strength training responses. I'll also add here that strength training (squats, overhead press, pull ups, etc.) also works out your core a lot, since you need to engage your core to stabilize your body during many of the exercises. You also mention that you run 8k every morning and do burpees afterward. I think you should read this ...


4

Follow the Strong Lifts or Starting Strength novice weight lifting programs, and you'll develop a strong "core". These programs utilize a 5x5 or 3x5 scheme (5 sets of 5 reps, or 3 sets of 5 reps) with incremental loading (you increase the weight 5 lbs per work out). The lifts in these program are: Squat Deadlift overhead press bench press (with proper ...


4

Use a small foam block that is just the right height so that if you are barely are touching it with your stomach, your hips are neither sagging nor lifted too high. The foam block should be very soft, so that it's not actually capable of supporting you at all.


3

It's hard for me to believe after running daily and doing a bunch of burpees, that your core is actually weak. And at 6'1" and 165 lbs, you are also not at all overweight. My guess is that at best you need to stand up straight and all of your belly fat problems will be solved. At worst, you are expressing negative body image issues that don't reflect your ...


3

Here's one simple visualization technique that engages and stabilizes your core: Imagine a straight line running through your body connecting anus to belly-button. Now, without sucking in, try to make that line as short as possible.


3

I'm going to assume by "ab exercises" you mean things like crunches, sit ups, leglifts, etc. Things that isolate the abs. Ab exercises do very little to help you burn fat, because they are essentially using 1 muscle group (abdominals). Ab exercises, when done properly, can help strengthen your core, which provides benefits across the board. However, many ...


3

It could be a combination of both. In order to be 100% sure I would need to see how you do it. In any case, if it's unsupportable pain I'm guessing there's something wrong. If you are ALWAYS sore after doing that exercise (even after a few weeks of doing them), you might be compensating. Concentrate on the glute contraction and everything should fall into ...


3

To use the plank to get stronger, you should plank for strenuous but submaximal times. In your case that would probably be sets of about 20 seconds, using multiple sets (e.g. 3-6) and resting briefly (e.g. 15 to 90 seconds) between sets. Aim for a reliable 40-second hold in a month or two. I agree with Arthlete that the only option that looks really ...


3

There's a couple things, and one of them you'll have to rely on whomever you are coaching (even if it's yourself): Glutes and abs should be engaged, with no sag in the middle (i.e. the back is straight) Legs should be board straight. There can be a slight bend at the hip. Avoid excessive angling of the legs at the hip joint. This engages the legs more ...


2

It's fine to skip arm specific exercises if you are already happy with how they are progressing without direct exercises. I personally focus more on my legs because I need them more for the sport I play. You can also focus more on strengthening exercises using something like Ausband than building large arm muscles. Which is what I do.


2

Assistance by a partner can be useful and can speed up the learning process. A partner can hold your legs and watch your form, even if she is not proficient in the handstand. This is only after you can hold the handstand by the wall. Also, be careful not to kick your partner accidentally. One really good assistance exercise was someone holding your ...


2

The phrase means different things to different people. We're never going to get consensus between Olympic weightlifting coaches, yoga instructors, physical therapists, and gym rats on what the phrase means. Generally, however, "engaging the core" means squeezing both your abs and your back simultaneously. Other muscles may be involved, depending on the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible