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8

First off, Ryans tip about doing calf raises in my own experience seems to reduce the risk of getting cramps. The easiest way to do these is by going to one of the benches around the pool near a wall and simply step up them with one leg. Repeat this 20x per leg should be a nice start of warming up your calves. Then I highly recommend this post on Swim ...


7

Not clear why they happen, though there are several theories. For running, exhaling on the left foot has helped me a lot. I would also get them sometimes while practicing kicks. This was trickier to work with, but a powerful exhale while kicking seemed to also help here (breathing exercises were indirectly useful as well).


6

There are various reasons for using fins. Don't give up on them as they can be an excellent training tool. As a swim coach, I do not take a 'one-fin-fits-all' approach, especially with training adults. Yes, foot size does matter and if the fin is ill-fitted (too small OR too big) the foot and ankle and foot will have to flex/tense more to use the fin. In ...


5

Other than the obvious causes of cramps (lack of electrolytes and/or hydration), I think time will help you out. I used to experience calf cramps frequently while swimming, albeit a few 100 yards in to my workout. Not kicking off the wall can help, but it's kind of fun to do so. Your body probably just needs to get used to using that kick-off calf ...


4

Most of the time, cramps come from electrolyte imbalance, and can be treated drinking more water and/or taking in more potassium, sodium, calcium, and/or magnesium. From your examples of cramps, I have always had the second type of cramping you mention, and no diet or nutrition changes have ever effected it in any way. Hyperthyroidism is also a known cause ...


3

According to Swim-City, your foot can cramp up if you deliberately point your toes when you swim. That's because in order to do so, you have to contract the muscles that run up the back of your leg, including your foot arch. This can be exacerbated by a variety of things, one of which is wearing fins: Wearing fins and kicking fast – for some reason the ...


2

The selected answer doesn't mean that you shouldn't use them, and is not the only reason for cramping. Sizing is the biggest factor in my swimmers. You may also acclimate by using them only a little bit on the first day and working up slowly to build foot and calf strength. Personally, I had foot cramping problems until I switched to tyrs a half size over ...


2

I highly doubt it. In general, cramps are caused by electrolyte imbalances and make your muscles contract uncontrollably for a period of time. The long term damage would be no more than what would happen if you contracted your muscles for the same amount of time. Now, you will need to fix the electrolyte imbalances with proper rest and hydration. ...


2

It depends on many thing and I would recommend consulting a doctor before continuing on. Having said that crunches are meant to do this Remember what superman said no pain no gain :) Make sure not to drink too much water or eat too much food before exercise. I am not asking to dehydrate yourself at all but stay away from excess water during exercise and ...


2

You might not need to warm up your calves more. You might just be dehydrated. Try reducing caffeine consumption, increasing water consumption, monitor your salt intake (if you're eating a ton of processed food, do that less, if you're eating all whole foods, make sure you get enough salt). I've heard potassium could help, but I've also heard it's a myth, ...


2

Jump rope! Maybe do one-legged in sets of paradiddles (left - right - left - left - right - left - right - right). I find when you do one legged jump roping it naturally keeps you on your toes (which will work your calfs more) and helps to ensure you aren't favoring one side. If your only goal is to warm up the calf muscle, you shouldn't need to do that ...


2

It is a matter of vasoconstriction of blood vessels. Usually your blood vessels constricts during cold and it reduces the blood flow.( Its actually the reverse of increased blood flow when using hot water bags in the inflammated or painful areas of your body). Its a normal mechanism in our body! You may prevent this by warm clothes or leg bandages! It will ...


1

I get similar kinds of cramps in my calves. I have a 2 part solution that's worked well for me: Eat a banana pre- or post-workout Buy a stick massager (below) and roll your muscles with it. It works best if the muscle is constricted while being massaged. This puts you at risk of cramping, and makes it extremely painful, but it does wonders for loosening up ...


1

OK, this is speculation as I'm not a woman, but in reading The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Clair Davies I came across a bit that mentioned some trigger points on the legs can contribute to a much more painful period, and it doesn't strike me as odd that running could set that off as well. If nobody else can give you a useful answer, I'd suggest ...


1

In the case of injury, consult a doctor as needed. Physical therapists may also help to prevent the injury from becoming serious. If you don't believe it to be serious, try to stretch the surrounding areas. Jay Dicharry of the UVA Speed Clinic recommends Standing Calf Stretches to target the soleus and gastroc muscles of the calf. For a better stretch, ...


1

If we are right handed we automatically use the right side more without thinking about it.Like reaching for something on the top shelf, we stretch using only the right leg, or play any sport, we lung with the right leg first. Have you had any serious injuries in the past like in your gastrocnemius and the soleus (calf)? This could be causing your cramp. ...


1

I would be uncomfortable with drinking both lots of tonic water and taking tablets. I don't see the point of worrying about quinine and I would be worried that you are diluting your system too much - and therefore don't have enough salt concentration. However, with the cramp happening at 19km or so I would be suspected undertraining more than electrolyte ...


1

40 km per week sounds like enough training miles to do a 1/2 marathon comfortably, but 30km doesn't. Could this just be a case of not doing enough miles of training before the main event? Or alternatively you're running too many miles the week before? The general advice is to reduce the mileage to the short-run amount during the final week, and skip your ...


1

There are a number of reasons why you could be experiencing cramps at that distance, most likely is under-training, meaning that the body is not used to doing that amount of exercise and is trying to warn you of this. Solving this would involve you doing the race distance a few times as part of your training, at a more relaxed pace. Another could be an ...


1

Perhaps fins are like running shoes. It seems I can wear a pair for about 5 months (swimming about 10 miles a week). After that period, the fins start to stretch out around the toe area. As soon as I replace them I'm good. I too cramp only at night, not during my early morning workouts when my fins start to wear. I like TYR fins too. Reasonable, ...


1

Just a suggestion, but try more potassium in your diet (found in, among other things, bananas and radishes). It works for me quite nicely! BUT be weary soliciting medical advice: if it persists consult a physician, because it could be symptomatic of another condition.


1

Stitches commonly occur if this is the first time you are running in a while. They also occur if your stomach is somewhat full. If you are a new runner or have not run in a while, just run at a slower pace where the pain does not occur. Also, run only after a couple of hours or more after having food or drink. More info on stitches can be found at this ...



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