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5

It depends. Are you trying to get better at dancing? Or are you trying to be more fit? Your "increased stamina" could fall into either category. Or both. Better at Dancing If you want to get good at a thing, you need to do the thing a lot. So: dance more. Practice solo at home, preferably in doses similar in intensity and duration to the group class. ...


4

If you have the muscles built already, then the thing you need to do is just practice. Eventually you'll remember to call on the muscles you need and it will become second nature. There is an example known as the Johari Window which is commonly used to portray this: Clockwise from the top-right corner: You don't realize there is more to learn, and so ...


4

Strength Let's take 3 different people, give them a 10lb dumbbell and tell them to lift it over their head until they are too tired to keep doing it: a 10 year old girl a marathon runner a strength trainer who can overhead press 200lbs In what order do you think they would fail to be able to continue lifting the dumbbell? Unless the 10 year old girl ...


4

I have no idea where you're getting your body image from of male ballet performers (as an example) being anything other than powerhouses. They don't train for hypertrophy, but plenty of male dancers (contemporary, ballet, etc) have very muscular physiques. I'd venture to guess that the guy below (a contemporary dancer) has far better strength performance ...


3

There are many different variables at play here, and it's not just restricted to exercise routines... Weight: It takes less effort to push a 110 lb body off the mat than it does a 200 lb body, so by having a leaner body they are more efficient with their muscles. Practice: It takes practice to do complex moves, and flips are certainly no exception. Simply ...


3

I think there's a couple of things you can do to survive the next edition of the Montreal Salsa Convention, though you might not like all of them. The easiest one is simply taking more rest and/or dance less intensive during the Convention. While this doesn't require any change in your lifestyle, its probably the least fun suggestion. Make sure you get ...


3

Rather than focus on weight loss, I'm going to focus on your goal of increasing muscle definition. Firstly, I understand that as a dancer there are certain restrictions that come with how you can look. Managing your weight and figure require self-discipline, which means ensuring that you are eating right and working out right every day. This isn't to say ...


2

trail mix bars and whole grain stuff and lots of proper health food Trail mix bars and whole grain anything is nowhere as healthy as you think. They are very pro inflamatory. Eat anti-inflamatory foods: that means large helpings of omega-3 foods (salmon, sardines, non-grain finished beef), no grains, nuts, seeds, or seed oils. No dairy, limited ...


2

No, as the pictures show they are absolutely not even remotely the same thing A turtle freeze might be a progression to a peacock pose - which is much closer to a full planche, but is much easier than a peacock or planche. The main differences come down to an altered center of gravity and how this impacts the effort required to balance the body on the ...


1

Hi Mark, Apart from the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday sessions, the routines shouldn't impose any special difficulty for your body. My concern, though is if your body would have recovered enough from the Muay Thai exercises before lifting heavy weights the following morning. You might not be able to perform your best on that. Maybe switching the dance ...


1

I don't find that routine to be too stressful, so long as you give yourself adequate time to adapt. Many athletes work out at much higher intensities multiple times per day, and there's no reason why anyone couldn't do the same -- given they follow healthy adaptation habits (like you mentioned: warming up, cooling down, stretching, myofascial release, ...


1

Your current plan will not work Dancing several times a week plus overeating will not produce the kind of weight gain you want. It probably won't produce any weight gain at all. Lift and eat (and dance) If you want to get bigger, then lift weights, eat lots, and prioritize quality mass gain. Salsa can be part of it, but it can't be all of it. ...


1

Given your body type, no amount of eating will make you gain weight. You have to lift weights to stimulate muscle growth. Also, unless you're steadily losing weight, don't concern yourself with replacing calories - your body is already dealing with the nutrients as it needs to. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good free resource for starting weight training.


1

Ok, dancing for that amount of time, you will burn somewhere in the range of 600-1000 calories. There isn't really a need to specially supplement, just eat something. Doesn't have to be anything specific. I might suggest things that are not really heavy on fats, like a double burger with cheese and bacon, but unless you have a sensitive stomach it doesn't ...


1

"...except that once a week I spend an hour leaping around a dance floor like a crazy person. And you know what? It turns out I am absurdly unfit. Shocking, I know. [...] I have been dancing for over 3 years now. When I say "I'm not getting fitter", I'm not saying that after just two sessions. I'm saying that after years of effort. " One hour per week is ...


1

To keep good posture you should work your pelvic floor, lower back, and ab muscles. Those muscles are always getting engaged in dancing. A tight core will greatly improve your dancing posture and make it easier for you to maintain that posture throughout the routine. Here are some exercises to help your endeavors: Posture Exercises - YouTube - need foam ...



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