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Short answer: deadlifts are mainly done (in terms of strength) with your hamstrings and glutes. It of course varies with the difference in style (from a "hardstyle" hamstring based DL to a more squat or quadriceps based). I thing the saying comes from the fact that you shouldn't dynamically use your lower (and usually upper) back. in terms of picking ...


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Your question is wrong, your view is also wrong. But I am going to give my 2 cents regardless. First; Deadlift is a pull, squat is a squat. Squat starts from the top, deadlift starts from the bottom. Knees do not lift anything, if you try and do that you are going to destroy them eventually. Doing deadlifts for repetitions and/or using little rest ...


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"Lift with your legs, not with your back" is a slapshod workaround to the real problem, which is that people are weak. Their backs, in particular, are weak. What fixes weak, injury-prone backs? Deadlifting fixes them. Deadlifts allow people to slowly, safely progress to a strong, injury-resistant back. One of the ways deadlifts can do this is by locking the ...


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I've done a lot research on proper form and near as I can tell the deadlift is a back lift. Doesn't this go completely against conventional wisdom? No. Conventional wisdom exists for the common person. The common person does not: go to the gym to regularly weight train train to brace their back and keep a strong spine have the flexibility to touch ...


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Deadlifts not only utilize your lower back, but your hamstrings and abs to stabilize yourself as well. Deadlifts (DL) are all about form. If you are arching your back in anyway, you are going to end up hurting your back in the long run. That's why when boxes say lift with your knees, it means don't arch your back and bend down low enough to have enough of ...


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Try to think of deadlifts as lifting with your back, but in a controlled, symmetrical and familiar manner. Generally, back injuries don't arise from simply lifting with your back. Problems arise when you lift something large, unwieldy, and unstable. A bar's weight is symmetrical around your lifting position. If the symmetry is ruined, and you try to ...


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Givanse, I find your answer not helpful. Although deadlift is the bigger exercise than press, common sense tell me that deadlift is easier to "grind out" from than press. If you find yourself struggling with press, you're more prone to injury. In case of deadlift, just drop the bar and you're fine. In conclusion press first before deadlift, provided that ...


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When I start to pull, inevitably my knee angle "wants" to open first to the point that my back is horizontal before the bar actually leaves the ground This sounds fine. Fully horizontal is a bit much, but lots of people get to near-horizontal and that's the way it should be. There's no need to keep your back angle constant from your setup. It's very ...



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