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2

"I've heard many people complain about not losing weight after a week" These are the same people who jump from program to program, expecting quick results. They're also the kind to jump on the latest weight loss fad/bandwagon. Don't be that guy :) "I've also heard people not seeing/feeling a difference after a month or so" These guys have the ...


0

The question is quite generic (no objectives on train or diet given). So, I'll answer based on my experience. When I want to cut (lose fat) I give a 3 week buffer period before changing the plan (diet or train) if not seeing the desired results. For instance, you are aiming to lose 1 lb of weight per week. But, it is common for the weight to fluctuate ...


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It's a pretty broad question and all I can offer up is anecdotal knowledge, but I'll take a stab at it. If I really dial in my diet, walk a couple of hours each day, and keep lifting, I can drop about 1lb of fat per week. I think that's "noticeable" on someone who otherwise stays pretty lean. More simply, a skinny person losing 10 pounds looks a lot ...


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I am going to hint you in with a secret, well actually two secrets, that so many "bodybuilders" lack to know and comprehend. For the first one, protein shakes are one of the biggest scams on the market. And not to mention the fact that they aren't even necessary in the first place. In a dinner consisting of a moderately sized piece of fish, a glass of ...


3

Protein supplements exist for one reason, and one reason only; If your usual diet doesn't provide you with enough protein to properly facilitate reaching your goals, you can add protein supplements to reach the target amount of protein per day/week. As it stands, the question isn't answerable due to lack of information. You need to find out how much ...


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None. There will never be a point where you have to consume supplements in order to reach your protein (or any other) goals, but it may make it easier.


-1

First and foremost, it doesn't matter if you get protein from supplements or from your food. It's just easier to eat large amounts of protein with supplements. Second, weight lifting doesn't "consume" protein to create muscle. No matter your level of weight lifting, eating large amounts of protein will tend to push your body towards muscle and away from ...


4

If I ride my bike to the gym, which is a mile from my house, and back home, should I do cardio at my gym. A 1 mile bike ride really doesn't qualify as a "cardio workout". I am also lifting weights 4 times a week ... and I run for 15 minutes after my ... weight training I really don't think this is enough workout that you need to worry about ...


1

To expand on the first answer, it depends. Cardio has two main uses: 1) It increases the amount of work you can do in a given workout session. As you get further into a workout, the aerobic system provides more and more of the energy used to lift the weights. Stronger aerobic system = more reps/sets completed. 2) It increases the calories your body needs ...


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The answer is simple: 1) If your goal is to lose weight - yes, do cardio! 2) If your priority is to put on mass and muscle, dont do it. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.


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I was in the same situation a year or so after starting working out. It just plateaued. Though I will say it's easy to think your progress has stalled, when in fact you just don't measure it. Get a caliper for your body fat, measure tape for circumferences, a scale for bodyweight, weekly photos and record that. The biggest bang for your buck is in your ...


0

There is no healthy or unhealthy food, only healthy and unhealthy diets, meaning it's what you eat in total during the days and the whole period that counts. If you eat little enough to lose weight, it will typically be beneficial for your health if you are overweight. However, some foods will make you more full, meaning it's easier to eat less for the rest ...


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Make sure the roti is made from whole-wheat flour, the rice should be brown rice and the bread should be whole grain bread. Also, make sure you eat at least 400 grams of vegetables during the day. The exercise you do should have sufficient intensity, you should measure how fast you run during that 20 minutes. If the pace is slower than about 13 km/h then ...


2

This is purely my opinion based on my experiences as a bodybuilder. The answer to your question is twofold. If you’re competitive, or, plan to be, you should look at having one “cheat” day per week as a general rule. The other 6 days, you should try to eat as clean as possible. If you aspire to that eating goal, your diet would be optimum 86% of the ...


3

Will eating lots of eggs and peanut butter, and drinking a lot of milk help you bulk up? Yes, however I hope that you are not just eating these for your breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you seriously want to gain muscle mass, then consider calculating your TDEE and add 200~500 calories(this is known caloric surplus). Next your protein intake should be 1g ...


3

Healthy is a fuzzy term. It probably doesn't matter much if you eat trans fats, big macs and protein bars or salads, quinoa and turkey, assuming that the macro nutrient amounts are equal. What does matter is the amount of protein. Also, eating healthy, if it really is healthy, will make you live better and longer.


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It is possible to get some muscle with a poor diet, but it will probably be slow, with high fat precent and not the full capacity of the body. Eating good is a vital thing to fully develop your body.



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