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1

Taking the assumption of a carb-bar and a protein-bar where there is no crossover: Carbs (when presented in bar form) usually give you fast energy, and is the primary reason they are popular with outdoor sport enthusiasts. A protein bar is usually intended as a supplement to your diet to replace what carbs you would have ingested, with protein. Protein on ...


1

No meal timing does not matter , only concern would be if you have energy at the gym. You may find you have more energy consuming carbs a few hours before. Other than that there is no difference. For protein other than whey, I use Greek yogurt , sometimes i make protein pancakes . you can Google for recipes


3

The premise for this notion is based upon glycogen depletion. Replenishing glycogen allows the body to recover better and start working on muscle repair, however, You would need to work out for a few hours to consider that your glycogen might have been depleted. Assuming your friend is an athlete like you claim he probably trains for hours at a time and ...


4

What your friend is referring to is commonly called the "Golden hour" or the "Golden Window". It is also dependent on the type of exercise that you are doing. Many studies have shown that for endurance exercisers that have a need to replace glycogen in both muscles and body storage, that sooner is better, as the body is primed to deliver glycogen to the ...


2

Protein shakes are mainly based on whey protein, which is the leftover when milk is coagulated during the process of cheese production. It is the same type of protein that you'll find in a lot of dairy products like milk, ricotta, etc. As such, there is no reason to fear protein shakes. However, I am reluctant to recommend using protein powder. As with ...


0

Focusing on your question alone and ignoring the rest of the information provided: Say you train for lean mass gain once a week. How should you adjust your diet through the week to support this? Taking your weight as a good example, it is fruitless (useless) to weight yourself every day because your weight fluctuates, weekly or even monthly is better ...


-1

I suggest a calorie deficit of 10% of you calculated calorie needs for fat loss. For example if you estimate you calorie needs to be 3000 kcal you would subtract 10% or 300 kcals which is 2700 kcal a day. As far as nutrients, try to strike a 30/40/30 balance between Protein/Carbs/Fat. I find that the best way to eat healthy is to eat as clean as you can ...


3

I don't believe that you'll find better research on the subject currently. Here's why: Until very recently, there was such a strong taboo in the medical community against acknowledging hormonal impacts (other than thyroid hormone deficit or overproduction) on basal metabolic rate (BMR) that nobody could get studies funded on it. People like me with ...


0

Gaining muscle mass requires a caloric surplus. Losing fat requires a caloric deficit. You can clearly see the contradiction. It isn't going to work, and especially not if you train for mass only once a week. You see, if you're in a caloric deficit, meaning you consume less than you expend, your body will have to provide the missing calories itself to ...


-3

I would suggest that eat whatever you want to eat. Try making diet plan, have meals on time, 30 minutes morning and evening exercise is must. This will definitely work.


-1

Try to consume 0.8 gram per pound protein a day and add HIIT program in your workout regime three times a week. In this way you will gain more muscle and HIIT program will boost your metabolism for increased fat loss.


1

I have been climbing and competing in this sport for a long time. I am not a mountaineer but I have done a lot of sport climbing in the past and have been primarily bouldering for the last 8 years. For hand strength I suggest being very cautious in how hard you push yourself in this regard. Always use open hands when doing training specific to finger ...



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