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13

I don't see any reason to avoid the egg yolks; they have just as much protein as the whites (see nutrition facts in @Uw Concept's answer). The avoidance of egg yolks in almost every case stems back to the (false) theory that eating egg yolks damages one's blood cholesterol profile. In reality, egg yolks have a lot of nutrients and just as much protein as a ...


11

You can eat as many eggs as you want, as long as you eat other kinds of food as well to balance out your diet. Here's why: Eggs contain a substantial amount of cholesterol. However, as you can read here, a substance called lecithin in the eggs inhibits the absorption of cholesterol, so most of the cholesterol in the egg will not be taken up by your body. ...


10

the Egg whites are used for the muscle to recover, and grow. The amount of egg whites you "should" eat varies from person to person, and according to how intense you work out. The yolks, however, contain a lot of calories and cholesterol. And eating 8 yolks a day is just messing with your liver. A very good alternative is taking egg whites as a powder, or ...


8

You might have some Ferrous Sulfide if cooked too long and kept in the hot water to cool slowly. You also might have some increased risk of salmonella poisoning for the soft boiled eggs. Other than that, I believe the nutritional content is essentially same. See the nutrition of 1oz raw egg and 1oz hard boiled egg. You'll see minor differences in the ...


7

The largest nutritional difference between something that's raw and cooked is going to be the structure of the fats, proteins, amino acids, and the like inside the food. In extreme cases, such as hyper-pasteurized milk, these products may be 'destroyed', or put into a state where your body can't reasonably use them. This doesn't mean that one or the other ...


5

According to this study you do want to cook your eggs for better bioavailability. As for soft vs hard, I think you should just go with whatever you prefer. "The true ileal digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein amounted to 90.9 ± 0.8 and 51.3 ± 9.8%, respectively. A significant negative correlation (r = −0.92, P < 0.001) was found between the ...


4

Yes, in raw eggs, especially in raw egg white an antinutrient called trypsin inhibitor protein is present which hinders in protein digestion. It can be destroyed by heating at 120 C for 15-20 minutes. Raw egg white also contains a protein called avidin which inhibits the absorption of Biotin-a B vitamin.If you cook the eggs both the factors are destroyed.


2

The primary benefit of hard boiled over soft boiled is less chance of salmonella, since getting sick would impact your ability to digest food in general, I'd say long term cooking the eggs more thoroughly is nutritionally better.


2

It features in Rocky therefore has all the associations related to that film. Egg yolks have lots of fat in, however egg whites are really just water and protein (about 90% water and 10% protein). They would be slightly cheaper than chicken if you don't mind eating 10 of them. Chicken however has a lot more protein as a percentage - 24% compared to 3%. It'd ...


1

I read the article, as an advocate of Intermittent Fasting for the past 4 months or so. It makes sense, and basically states that the inclusion of BCAA's post and pre-workout are beneficial to preventing the catabolic state that your body can go into during intense workouts without the immediate nutrition we are all so accustomed to. Your questions: would ...



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